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    #1

    Rich Experience

    Ex.

    Josh has a rich experience with the study of animals.

    Josh has rich experience with the study of animals.


    Are both acceptable academically? The intended meaning is to say that Josh has much experience with the study of animals.

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    #2

    Re: Rich Experience

    They don't sound natural to me. I'd use something like considerable experience in.

  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Rich Experience



    "It has been a very deep experience," says al-Rahji. "I am satisfied, I don't have a problem with it.
    More: Insulting the Sultan in Oman - By Peter Salisbury | The Middle East Channel

    Can I say I have a very deep experience in ...?

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    #4

    Re: Rich Experience

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post


    "It has been a very deep experience," says al-Rahji. "I am satisfied, I don't have a problem with it.
    More: Insulting the Sultan in Oman - By Peter Salisbury | The Middle East Channel

    Can I say I have a very deep experience in ...?

    It's strange.

    Most people would say 'vast experience, 'broad experience' etc.



    Sorry, in that context, I believe he's referring to a more meaningful experience.

    So he's saying it's been meaningful/considerable etc experience.

    In this context, he is saying he has learnt much/gained further views on a particular subject etc

    However in the original post, he/she is trying to describe the amount of skill he/she has, hence 'broad', 'vast' etc.
    Last edited by HanibalII; 28-Oct-2012 at 09:15.
    I'm not a teacher yet, but I am studying a Bachelor of Education with an English Literature major at Charles Sturt University, in NSW, Australia.

  2. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Rich Experience



    I hold a certificate from the school of hard knocks or I have a certificate from the school of hard knocks. Do they make sense?


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    #6

    Re: Rich Experience

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post


    I hold a certificate from the school of hard knocks or I have a certificate from the school of hard knocks. Do they make sense?


    'Have' is more widely used. However in certain jobs/positions 'hold' can be used.

    Example
    'I hold a license to....."

    It's not typically used to describe your possession of a certificate.
    I'm not a teacher yet, but I am studying a Bachelor of Education with an English Literature major at Charles Sturt University, in NSW, Australia.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Rich Experience

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post


    "It has been a very deep experience," says al-Rahji. "I am satisfied, I don't have a problem with it.
    More: Insulting the Sultan in Oman - By Peter Salisbury | The Middle East Channel

    Can I say I have a very deep experience in ...?
    I think you need to reacquaint yourself with the different definitions of the word "experience": experience - definition of experience by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: Rich Experience

    Quote Originally Posted by HanibalII View Post
    Sorry, in that context, I believe he's referring to a more meaningful experience.
    Yes, but he's not saying it very well IMO.

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