Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Saudi Arabia
      • Current Location:
      • Saudi Arabia

    • Join Date: Aug 2012
    • Posts: 1,617
    #1

    The Haia give ...


    The Haia give special emphasis on proficiency of the workers in foreign languages because a considerable number of the Haj pilgrims do not understand Arabic.

    More: Women Haia members to enforce mixing ban | ArabNews

    Then we have

    What makes this incident different is the young woman’s knowledge of her rights and what the Haia is permitted to do and what not to do.

    More: Saudi Women & Religious Police – Reading Between the Lines | Welcome to Haya's House


    Then we have

    Chief says Haia is in need of female staff

    He also told the newspaper that the Haia was in need of female personnel, and hoped hiring would begin soon.

    More:Chief says Haia is in need of female staff | ArabNews


    Shouldn't be The Haia gives...?


  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,893
    #2

    Re: The Haia give ...

    You'll find very little consistency in English when choosing whether to use the singular or plural form of verbs after these kinds of nouns. You'll see the same issue with "team", "police", "staff" etc. The author of that piece should have chosen one and stuck with it, but it's not all that surprising.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #3

    Re: The Haia give ...

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello,


    I believe that you 100% correct.

    1. "Professor" Google told me that "HAIA" means (in English): The Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice." The key word, then, is "commission."

    2. Here in the States, "commission" is usually considered a singular word. (Unless, you wanted to emphasize the different

    members of the commission.)

    a. We might say, "The Commission on Good English has made a decision regarding the use of the subjunctive." But we might

    say, "The Commission on Good English hate one another." (That is, the commission members hate ....)

    3. Not only should it be "The Haia gives," but did you notice that the commission was referred to as "the Haia" three times but without the "the" in "Chief says Haia is in need of female staff." I am guessing that is newspaper headline talk for:

    "The Chief says that The Haia is in need of female staff."

    4. One other point: I think that Americans would be more comfortable with HAIA, not Haia. E.g., Americans refer to

    NATO, while -- I believe -- some English varieties refer to Nato. Also: AIDS versus Aids.


    James

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,893
    #4

    Re: The Haia give ...

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello,


    I believe that you 100% correct.

    1. "Professor" Google told me that "HAIA" means (in English): The Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice." The key word, then, is "commission."

    2. Here in the States, "commission" is usually considered a singular word. (Unless, you wanted to emphasize the different

    members of the commission.)

    a. We might say, "The Commission on Good English has made a decision regarding the use of the subjunctive." But we might

    say, "The Commission on Good English hate one another." (That is, the commission members hate ....)

    3. Not only should it be "The Haia gives," but did you notice that the commission was referred to as "the Haia" three times but without the "the" in "Chief says Haia is in need of female staff." I am guessing that is newspaper headline talk for:

    "The Chief says that The Haia is in need of female staff."

    4. One other point: I think that Americans would be more comfortable with HAIA, not Haia. E.g., Americans refer to

    NATO, while -- I believe -- some English varieties refer to Nato. Also: AIDS versus Aids.


    James
    I would mark "Aids" as incorrect in any piece of writing. It should always be AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome).
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #5

    Re: The Haia give ...

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I would mark "Aids" as incorrect in any piece of writing. It should always be AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome).
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Excellent advice.

    Hopefully, the Guardian (one of your leading and most literate newspapers) will take your advice.


    James

  4. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Netherlands

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 1,458
    #6

    Re: The Haia give ...

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I would mark "Aids" as incorrect in any piece of writing. It should always be AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome).
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    I agree with you, but oddly enough the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English doesn't...

    AIDS - Definition from Longman English Dictionary Online

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,893
    #7

    Re: The Haia give ...

    I'm very surprised by the Guardian and the dictionary entry. I don't know why. It seems to me that consistency in English is not a priority.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,627
    #8

    Re: The Haia give ...

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I'm very surprised by the Guardian and the dictionary entry. I don't know why. It seems to me that consistency in English is not a priority.
    As well as being the most honest and intelligent of newspapers, "The Grauniad" used to be famous for mipsrints. (Sadly there are far fewer these days)

  7. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #9

    Re: The Haia give ...

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "The Grauniad" used to be famous for mipsrints. (Sadly there are far fewer these days)

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,893
    #10

    Re: The Haia give ...

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    As well as being the most honest and intelligent of newspapers, "The Grauniad" used to be famous for mipsrints. (Sadly there are far fewer these days)
    I still call it The Grauniad! Mind you, I've never read it. The back page of the Daily Telegraph was full of errors 30 years ago. I have no idea about it now.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [Idiom] 'give the time of day' / 'give the light of day'
    By Olympian in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Mar-2012, 18:42
  2. give you a ride home/give you a lift home
    By allthewayanime in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Oct-2011, 17:28
  3. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 05-Jan-2011, 00:26

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •