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    #1

    "say for example"

    When I was hearing a lecture last week at my university, I heard 4 times: say for example.

    But haven't SAY and FOR EXAMPLE the same meaning? For native speakers of English, would you use such a phrase?

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    #2

    Re: "say for example"

    Quote Originally Posted by nelson13 View Post
    When While I was hearing listening to a lecture last week at my university, I heard 4 times: say for example.

    But haven't SAY and FOR EXAMPLE the same meaning? For native speakers of English, would you use such a phrase?
    ***NOT A TEACHER***

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    #3

    Re: "say for example"

    You will hear it a lot but it's tautological. In an ideal world, the lecturer should have chosen either "say" or "for example". However, the following construction is OK - "Let's say, for example, that I have been chosen to go into space". In that case "Let's say" means "Let's pretend" or "Let's imagine".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: "say for example"

    Thank you for your correction.

    So do you think HEAR in this case should not be used in the progressive tense?

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    #5

    Re: "say for example"



    Quote Originally Posted by nelson13 View Post
    So do you think HEAR in this case should not be used in the progressive tense?
    ***NOT A TEACHER***

    Yes, I do.

    An English-Zone.Com Chart: Progressive and Non-Progressive Verbs


    Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary

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    #6

    Re: "say for example"

    Thank you.

  7. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "say for example"

    You 'listen to', 'go to', or 'attend' a lecture, unless you're the lecturer (who 'gives it'). But in the context of your original post, I think 'listening to' is a bit excessive [as if you wanted to make it clear that you were actually listening, and not making paper aeroplanes ]. You could just say something like 'I was at a lecture last week, and the lecturer kept saying ...'.

    b

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