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  1. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 5,226
    #1

    No more than

    As I learned and know, "no more than" means "only", while "not more than" "not exceeding" or "same or less than". But when native speakers hear "no more than" like in the example, do they also perceive it as "not more than"?

    go1-19
    M: Well, thatís a bit too much. Is there a cheaper one?
    W: Approximately, how much are you thinking of spending?
    M: No more than $200.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2010
    • Posts: 1,696
    #2

    Re: No more than

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    As I learned and know, "no more than" means "only", while "not more than" "not exceeding" or "same or less than". But when native speakers hear "no more than" like in the example, do they also perceive it as "not more than"?

    go1-19
    M: Well, thatís a bit too much. Is there a cheaper one?
    W: Approximately, how much are you thinking of spending?
    M: No more than $200.
    Interesting. I will spend no more than $200.00. I will spend $50.00 and I will spend $125.00. Actually, I will spend any amount up to $200.00. I will not spend any amount (read - no more than) $200.00.

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