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    #1

    Guiltlessness

    1. Lesley looked quite fresh even though she'd been playing tennis.
    2. Although Kevin was not guilty, they executed him.

    - Could I use the following instead using the above for writing?

    1a. In spite of having been playing tennis, Lesley looked quite fresh.
    1b. Despite her playing tennis, Lesley looked quite fresh.

    2a. In spite of not being guilty, they executed him.
    2b. Despite his being innocence, they executed him.
    2b. Despite Kevin's guiltlessness, they executed him.

    Thank you so much, Teachers!

    namloan

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    #2

    Re: Guiltlessness

    Quote Originally Posted by namloan View Post
    1. Lesley looked quite fresh even though she'd been playing tennis.
    2. Although Kevin was not guilty, they executed him.

    - Could I use the following instead using the above for writing?

    1a. In spite of having been playing tennis, Lesley looked quite fresh. Yes, but it's got nothing to do with 'guiltlessness'.
    1b. Despite her playing tennis, Lesley looked quite fresh. No.

    2a. In spite of not being guilty, they executed him. This doesn't work for me.
    2b. Despite his being innocence, they executed him.
    2b. Despite Kevin's guiltlessness, they executed him. It's OK, but I don't think any native speaker would say 'guiltlessness' rather than 'innocence'.
    A better thread title would have been Despite/in spite of, which would have led you to these Similar Threads.

    Rover

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    #3

    Re: Guiltlessness

    I'd go with "Despite having played tennis, Lesley looked quite fresh."
    and "Despite Kevin being innocent, he was executed."

    Of your options I'd say 1a) wrong ("in spite of HER (or HIM?) having been playing tennis" (a horribly awkward structure)
    b) ok but sounds odd
    2a) wrong "in spite of HIS not being guilty" (same clumsy structure as 1a)
    2b) wrong "innocent" (adjective not noun)
    2c) wrong (no such word)

    There's a legal distinction between "not guilty" and "innocent" but we don't need to go into that here!

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    #4

    In spite of / Despite

    Dear Rover_KE and MartinEnglish!

    - It should be "Despite Kevin's being innocent" not "Despite Kevin being innocent", right?

    Thank you so much, Teachers!

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    #5

    Re: In spite of / Despite

    Quote Originally Posted by namloan View Post
    - It should be "Despite Kevin's being innocent" not "Despite Kevin being innocent", right?
    Some people use one form, some the other. Both are fine.

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