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  1. sky3120's Avatar
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    #1

    get something to do / ing

    I couldn't get the engine to start. VS. I couldn't get the engine starting.

    I saw the either one and I was wondering if there is any nuance or different usage between them to native English speakers? Thank you so much as usual and have a good day.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: get something to do / ing

    Only 'to start' is natural.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: get something to do / ing

    However, we would say "I couldn't get the engine going".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. sky3120's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: get something to do / ing

    Thank you and ah! it is about a natural thing. Then do you agree that "to run" and "running" are possible for the same meaning? Thank you so much as usual.
    Last edited by sky3120; 26-Nov-2012 at 15:29.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: get something to do / ing

    Quote Originally Posted by sky3120 View Post
    Thank you and ah! it is about a natural thing. Then do you agree that "to run" and "running" are possible for the same meaning? Thank you so much sir as usual.
    We wouldn't say "to run" in that context, though we might say "running". It's one of those irritating things about the English language. Sometimes there is just no logic to what does and doesn't sound natural to native speakers.

    Please note that it is not appropriate to use "sir" in your posts, especially when so many of the volunteers here are female. No titles are required.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: get something to do / ing

    I think "I can't get the engine to run" is possible. "The engine starts but I can't get it to run, it keeps cutting out." I have had this problem.

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