Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. Marina Gaidar's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Jun 2012
    • Posts: 274
    #1

    be out

    I'm not really good at everyday language, especially at phrasal verbs. Help me please. In these sentences "We will go together, you and me. Our journey may be dangerous, so tell me now if you are out" is it normal to use be out? It is not a modern text, so I would like to know if this phrasal verb is not too modern.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,615
    #2

    Re: be out

    Quote Originally Posted by Marina Gaidar View Post
    I'm not really good at everyday language, especially at phrasal verbs. Help me please. In these sentences "We will go together, you and me. Our journey may be dangerous, so tell me now if you are out" is it normal to use be out? It is not a modern text, so I would like to know if this phrasal verb is not too modern.

    Thanks in advance.
    "Our journey may be dangerous, so tell me now if you are out." This is fine, it means "tell me if you are not going to take part". It's not a phrasal verb.

  3. englishhobby's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 1,678
    #3

    Re: be out

    "To be out" is not a phrasal verb as it isn't followed by a preposition or adverb.

    A
    phrasal verb consists of a verb and a preposition or adverb that modifies or changes the meaning; 'give up' is a phrasal verb that means 'stop doing' something, which is very different from 'give'.
    Read more at Phrasal Verbs - Glossary Definition - UsingEnglish.com
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,838
    #4

    Re: be out

    We use "in" and "out" in some contexts to denote participation.

    - We're getting pizza tonight. Are you in?
    - No thanks. I'm going to eat at my parents.

    - A group of us are going on holiday this summer. Do you want to come?
    - No, count me out. I've got no money.

    - You don't sound like you really want to come for that picnic in the mountains on Saturday. We're relying on you for transport so you need to tell me now if you're out.
    - I'll be there. Don't worry!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •