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    #1

    Present Perfect vs Present Perfect Progressive

    Is there any difference in meaning between the two sentences:

    "I have been working here for ten years".
    "I have worked here for ten years".

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Present Perfect vs Present Perfect Progressive

    Quote Originally Posted by sergeyrais View Post
    Is there any difference in meaning between the two sentences:

    "I have been working here for ten years".
    "I have worked here for ten years".
    For all practical purposes, no.

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    #3

    Re: Present Perfect vs Present Perfect Progressive

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    For all practical purposes, no.
    Could the usage of the Present Perfect Progressive in the sentence "I have been working here for ten years" be understood as the means to turn the attention to the length of the action, while the usage of the Present Perfect Simple in the sentence "I have worked here for ten years" is explained by the speaker's wish just to state the action?

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    #4

    Re: Present Perfect vs Present Perfect Progressive

    Almost by definition, the progressive (continuous) aspect is used when there is some emphasis on the (limited) duration of a situation - indeed, I prefer to think of it as the 'durative aspect'.

    In that it is used for situations begun in the past and having some relevance to (and often continuation until) the present, the perfect aspect also frequently carries aome implication of duration.

    There is also the point that some verbs, such as 'live' (= 'reside) and, frequently, 'work', have in their core meaning some idea of duration (Compare: "I am staying with my parents" and "I am living with my parents". If we have just those two statements with no further context, then the first implies a more temporary situation -i.e., of shorter duration - than the second.) "I work at Macy's" generally implies a full-time, permanent job.

    So, for all practical purposes, as bhai said, there may be no difference between "I have worked here for ten years" and "I have been working here for ten years". Speakers are probably just as likely to utter one as the othe other, with no thought of different shades of meaning.

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