Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Saudi Arabia
      • Current Location:
      • Saudi Arabia

    • Join Date: Aug 2012
    • Posts: 1,616
    #1

    "If we , we could abolish homework in a French minute."


    "If we provided after-school music lessons, museum trips, and cool sports programs to poor children, we could abolish homework in a French minute. No one would miss it."
    More: Louis Menand: The End of Homework? : The New Yorker
    Does that mean that helping poor children is unachievable? Or it is a daydream if you think that poor children will get help? What do you, dear native speakers, call that in English language?

    Thank you,

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,595
    #2

    Re: "If we , we could abolish homework in a French minute."

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post

    "If we provided after-school music lessons, museum trips, and cool sports programs to poor children, we could abolish homework in a French minute. No one would miss it."
    More: Louis Menand: The End of Homework? : The New Yorker
    Does that mean that helping poor children is unachievable? Or it is a daydream if you think that poor children will get help? No, it doesn't say that at all. What do you, dear native speakers, call that in English language? I don't understand this question.

    Thank you,
    Bhai.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #3

    Re: "If we , we could abolish homework in a French minute."

    It's a play on words. A "New York minute" is very fast, presumably since people there are always in a rush. Since this is about France, the author said a "French minute" instead.

    Urban Dictionary: New York Minute

  3. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Saudi Arabia
      • Current Location:
      • Saudi Arabia

    • Join Date: Aug 2012
    • Posts: 1,616
    #4

    Re: "If we , we could abolish homework in a French minute."

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I don't understand this question.
    Thank you, SoothingDave and Bhai, so very much for spreading word and sharing it. Dear Bhai, I am so sorry for failing to make myself more understood. My bad English acts as a barrier to get my point across. Besides, I couldn't construct a clear, understandable question. However, satisfactory and definitive answers have been submitted thanks to your intellect minds. Again, thank you.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Nov 2012
    • Posts: 77
    #5

    Re: "If we , we could abolish homework in a French minute."

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post

    "If we provided after-school music lessons, museum trips, and cool sports programs to poor children, we could abolish homework in a French minute. No one would miss it."
    More: Louis Menand: The End of Homework? : The New Yorker
    Does that mean that helping poor children is unachievable? Or it is a daydream if you think that poor children will get help? What do you, dear native speakers, call that in English language?

    Thank you,
    The sentence "
    If we provided after-school music lessons, museum trips, and cool sports programs to poor children, we could abolish homework in
    a French minute" means that they don't provide
    after-school music lessons, museum trips, and cool sports programs to poor children, therefore they cannot abolish homework in
    a French minute.

  4. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Saudi Arabia
      • Current Location:
      • Saudi Arabia

    • Join Date: Aug 2012
    • Posts: 1,616
    #6

    Re: "If we , we could abolish homework in a French minute."

    Quote Originally Posted by sergeyrais View Post
    The sentence "
    If we provided after-school music lessons, museum trips, and cool sports programs to poor children, we could abolish homework in
    a French minute" means that they don't provide
    after-school music lessons, museum trips, and cool sports programs to poor children, therefore they cannot abolish homework in
    a French minute.
    Thank you. According to the context, doesnt "a French minute" mean short period?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Nov 2012
    • Posts: 77
    #7

    Re: "If we , we could abolish homework in a French minute."

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post
    Thank you. According to the context, doesn’t "a French minute" mean short period?
    "A French minute" might mean a short period of time, but I would tend towards possible understanding it as a name of a radio/TV programme or as a name of newspaper/magazine column.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #8

    Re: "If we , we could abolish homework in a French minute."

    Quote Originally Posted by sergeyrais View Post
    "A French minute" might mean a short period of time, but I would tend towards possible understanding it as a name of a radio/TV programme or as a name of newspaper/magazine column.
    The 'period of time' reading makes good sense in the context provided. It's hard to see how a programme or magazine column makes any sense.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #9

    Re: "If we , we could abolish homework in a French minute."

    It seems perfectly clear to me that a person writing in a magazine called "The New Yorker" would be making a play on the concept of a "New York minute."

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Nov 2012
    • Posts: 77
    #10

    Re: "If we , we could abolish homework in a French minute."

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post
    Thank you. According to the context, doesn’t "a French minute" mean short period?
    Since in a minute = soon
    therefore I guess in a French minute = soon from the point of view of French mentality.

    If you make your comments on this message I will analyze them and try to answer in a Russian minute.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 17-Sep-2012, 04:23
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-Jul-2012, 19:53
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 26-Jan-2012, 17:35
  4. "up-to-date" and "up-to-the-minute"
    By fenglish in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-Nov-2011, 10:39
  5. confusing words "expressed" or "express" and "named" or"names"
    By Dawood Usmani in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2007, 19:33

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •