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    #1

    Confusion about plurality

    Hi,
    I am a bit confused by plurality in agreement. For example, if I want to say "ONE green book and ONE red book on the table" with ellipsis, which of the following choices should be used?

    1) There are a green and red book on the table.
    2) There are green and red books on the table.

    Thank you very much!

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Confusion about plurality

    Quote Originally Posted by thincat View Post
    Hi,
    I am a bit confused by plurality in agreement. For example, if I want to say "ONE green book and ONE red book on the table" with ellipsis, which of the following choices should be used?

    1) There are a green and red book on the table.
    2) There are green and red books on the table.

    Thank you very much!
    I can't imagine having to say that very often. If the necessity arose I would probably say "There's a green book and a red book on the table".

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: Confusion about plurality

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I can't imagine having to say that very often. If the necessity arose I would probably say "There's a green book and a red book on the table".
    Thank you for your comments.

    I think it's something related to usage. But, I mean if we just take grammar, such as agreement, into consideration, are the two sentences grammatical?

    Because I see that, in English, sometimes people would use a structure like (Adj + Conjunction + Adj + N) as a short form of (Adj + N + Conjunction + Adj + N). But I get confused by the singular and plural agreement of the N. What if in the original structure, (Adj + N + Conjunction + Adj + N), both Nouns are in singular form and co-referential, then in the contracted form, (Adj + Conjunction + Adj + N), should I place a definite article a/an to make it as ( A/An +Adj + Conjunction + Adj + N[singular noun]) or add a plural marker to the noun to make it as (Adj + Conjunction + Adj + N[plural noun])?
    I guess the examples I use may be a bit odd in daily usage, but I cannot think of a better one at the moment to demonstrate these two structures.

    I hope I do not make it too complicated... Can anyone help me?

    Thank you!

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