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  1. Newbie
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      • Native Language:
      • Russian
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      • Russian Federation
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    • Join Date: Dec 2012
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    #1

    Post Take His ID

    By "the police took his ID", does it mean something like they wrote down his name, address, etc, or does it mean something like they physically took possession of his ID card

    • Member Info
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      • English
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      • England
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    #2

    Re: Take His ID

    Without further context, mounta, it's difficult to tell.

    Where did you encounter this sentence?

    Rover

  2. Newbie
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    #3

    Re: Take His ID

    I thought it was common, like the police stopping suspicious looking people and "taking their ID". So, "police took his ID" is not good English?

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    #4

    Re: Take His ID

    'The police checked his ID' is fine. They wouldn't have 'taken' it and kept it, except in special circumstances—such as if they suspected it had been forged.

    Rover

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Take His ID

    In BrE, if you are stopped by the police and asked to tell them your name, we would say "The police took down his ID" - here, "to take down" means to write on a piece of paper or in his police notepad.
    If I heard "The police took my ID", I would assume that they policeman had taken possession of an actual identity document - passport etc. That would not happen in the UK unless you were actually under arrest.

    Note that in the UK, we are not required to carry any form of identification with us by law. If we are stopped while driving a car (stopped for a legitimate reason - we don't have random stop and search here), we may be asked to say whether it is our personal car, give the registration number and then give our name and address. A check can be made on a mobile computer to see if the car's registration number and the name and address of the owner match what we told them. If we are found to have committed a minor offence (ie one of our brake lights isn't working), we can be told to get it fixed and also to attend a local police station with our driving licence and the ownership documents of the car within 7 days.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: Take His ID

    I think took his ID could be used to mean recording the details too. Maybe it's AmE creep or I have lived abroad too long, but it sounds OK to me.

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