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  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #1

    Ill cookie you!



    In fact, almost any adjective can be used as a noun, just put the in front of it: The dead shall walk the earth. And any noun can be used as a verb, like in the famous example, Ill cookie you! The possibilities are endless, as long as youre creative. All this makes English a lot of fun- but it also definitely makes the language complicated!

    cookie - WordReference.com Dictionary of English

    Dictionary - Yahoo! Education

    cookie - definition of cookie by Macmillan Dictionary

    cookie - Definitions in British English Dictionary and Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionary Online

    Online Etymology Dictionary

    Cookie | Define Cookie at Dictionary.com

    cookie: meaning and definitions — Infoplease.com

    cookie | Free On-Line English Dictionary | Thesaurus | Children's, Intermediate Dictionary | Wordsmyth


    cookie - Wiktionary

    cookie - Dictionary Definition : Vocabulary.com

    Definition of cookie | Collins English Dictionary


    After checking all these dictionaries, I havent found a proof that says that the word "Cookie" can be used as a verb. Will you set me free from confusion, please? Also, I couldn't catch the meaning of "Ill cookie you!"

    Thank you, people, immensely for your help and understanding and apologize profusely for any inconvenience.


  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Ill cookie you!

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post


    In fact, almost any adjective can be used as a noun, just put “the” in front of it: “The dead shall walk the earth.” And any noun can be used as a verb, like in the famous example, “I’ll cookie you!” The possibilities are endless, as long as you’re creative. All this makes English a lot of fun- but it also definitely makes the language complicated!

    cookie - WordReference.com Dictionary of English

    Dictionary - Yahoo! Education

    cookie - definition of cookie by Macmillan Dictionary

    cookie - Definitions in British English Dictionary and Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionary Online

    Online Etymology Dictionary

    Cookie | Define Cookie at Dictionary.com

    cookie: meaning and definitions — Infoplease.com

    cookie | Free On-Line English Dictionary | Thesaurus | Children's, Intermediate Dictionary | Wordsmyth


    cookie - Wiktionary

    cookie - Dictionary Definition : Vocabulary.com

    Definition of cookie | Collins English Dictionary


    After checking all these dictionaries, I haven’t found a proof that says that the word "Cookie" can be used as a verb. Will you set me free from confusion, please? Also, I couldn't catch the meaning of "I’ll cookie you!"

    Thank you, people, immensely for your help and understanding and apologize profusely for any inconvenience.

    It can't be used as a verb. Where is that text from? It's nonsense.

  3. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Ill cookie you!

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post
    And any noun can be used as a verb, like in the famous example, “I’ll cookie you!” The possibilities are endless, as long as you’re creative.
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Well, I don't know about any noun, but I have heard 'Can I beer you?' meaning 'Can I offer you a beer?'

    I'm not familiar with 'cookie' used as a verb though.

  4. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Ill cookie you!



    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Where is that text from?
    10 Reasons Why English Is A Hard Language

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    #5

    Re: Ill cookie you!

    It may exist, but it's not that famous- I have never heard it and Google only has a few thousand examples. I can see the idea, but it's a poor choice as an example of a famous case of a noun becoming a verb.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Ill cookie you!

    The most likely meaning isn't obvious, but I found in the IT world a software engineer would often put him or herself in the position of the code they were writing. 'I take your input and validate it before returning a success response to your getAddress() call'; I='my code' and 'you'="your code".

    Now if, in this case, you are runnnig an internet browser and I send you 'a cookie', it would make a kind of sense to say 'I'll cookie you'; you'd win no prizes for commmunication though.

    b

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    #7

    Re: Ill cookie you!

    "Cookie" may not be the best example, but you do have to admit that English does allow for the verbing of many nouns.

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    #8

    Re: Ill cookie you!

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    "Cookie" may not be the best example, but you do have to admit that English does allow for the verbing of many nouns.
    Absolutely, and changing many other forms too.

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Ill cookie you!

    The phrase "I'll X you!" can take almost any word that's silly enough. It's a type of nonsense phrase that you say when someone is bothering you about X - often said by a mother to a child. (It might not occur in all English-speaking places).
    It's a vague, non-specific threat.
    Child: I want a cookie! Give me a cookie!
    Mother: Look, I'll cookie you if you're not careful!"

    I'd advise learners not to bother trying to use this construction.

  7. BobK's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Ill cookie you!

    Shakespeare did it, and I'd be surpised if he was the first. In 'But me no buts' he first turned a conjunction into a verb, and then used that as a noun.

    b

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