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  1. wotcha's Avatar
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    #1

    He has been to New York, in which his brother studies at a college.

    "He has been to New York, in which his brother studies at a college."


    Is the above sentence grammatical?

    I mean is it ok to put a comma before a preposition and a relative pronoun?

  2. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: He has been to New York, in which his brother studies at a college.

    There are no universally accepted rules about the use of commas. The style manuals of highly respected journals have various rules.

    For myself, I would use the comma in your example, but I would say where rather than in which. Also, you should use the present continuous tense is studying rather than the simple present studies.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: He has been to New York, in which his brother studies at a college.

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    There are no universally accepted rules about the use of commas. The style manuals of highly respected journals have various rules.
    I have to disagree about your first sentence here on a technicality. There are some universally accepted rules, but there is no one collection of rules which is accepted universally.

    "He has been to New York, where his brother studies at a college."
    In this case, I'd say the comma is mandatory. Are there any style manuals that don't suggest a comma before a non-defining clause?
    "He has been to a city where his brother studies at a college." Does anyone suggest a comma before a defining clause?

    I thought this rule was close enough to being universal.


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