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  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #1

    'Sneak', 'tell-tale', 'whistle-blower', and 'dobber'?

    Hi,

    Are all these terms used in BrE? I was wondering if any was used more commonly in everyday English.

  2. Moderator
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    #2

    Re: 'Sneak', 'tell-tale', 'whistle-blower', and 'dobber'?

    'Sneak', and 'tell-tale' are more likely to be used by children.

    Criminals use 'snitch', 'squealer' and 'grass'.

    'Whistle-blowers' reveal wasteful practices or corrupt activity by their bosses at work.

    'Dobber' is chiefly use informally in Australia and New Zealand.

    Rover

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 'Sneak', 'tell-tale', 'whistle-blower', and 'dobber'?

    I agree with Rover on all but the final point. "Dobber" was regularly used when I was at school and we frequently referred to "dobbing someone in". I have been known to use the last phrase more recently too, usually in a joking fashion.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. BobK's Avatar
    Harmless drudge
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    #4

    Re: 'Sneak', 'tell-tale', 'whistle-blower', and 'dobber'?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I agree with Rover on all but the final point. "Dobber" was regularly used when I was at school and we frequently referred to "dobbing someone in". I have been known to use the last phrase more recently too, usually in a joking fashion.
    Quite understandable. A lot of features of current Australian started life in local English usages.

    b

    PS I remember a playground chant/taunt:

    Tell-tale-tit
    Your tongue shall be slit
    And all the dogs in the town
    Shall have a little bit.

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