Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: There's no cuts

  1. Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Aug 2011
    • Posts: 1,056
    #1

    There's no cuts

    The following dialogues are from a moive:

    Mother: Baby. What happened to your face. How did you get these cuts. Who did this to you?
    Daughter: Did what?
    Mother: The cuts on your face.
    Daughter: There's no cuts.

    If we refer to a countable noun, we usually use "There are no" with a plural noun. I am wondering if native speakers would say "There's no cuts" in spoken English? For sake of convenience, I am supposed native speakers would say There's no... at the beginning without thinking about whether the subsequent noun is countable or uncountable. Am I correct?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by Winwin2011; 15-Jan-2013 at 09:08.

  2. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 66,900
    #2

    Re: There's no cuts

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    I am wondering if native speakers would say "There's no cuts" in spoken English? For sake of convenience, I am supposed native speakers would say There's no... at the beginning without thinking about whether the subsequent noun is countable or uncountable. Am I correct?
    It's not uncommon in colloquial spoken English, at least in British English. I think it's more a question of flow rather than not thinking. You will hear things like There's two things I have to say, where there's no question of not thinking- it's easier to say.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •