Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Duck's idiom.

  1. Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Saudi Arabia
      • Current Location:
      • Saudi Arabia

    • Join Date: Dec 2006
    • Posts: 240
    #1

    Duck's idiom.

    Steven Finn out for a duck.

    I have read this in BBC, could you please tell me what does "a duck" mean here?

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 27,915
    #2

    Re: Duck's idiom.

    If you are 'out for a duck' in cricket, you have scored no runs when you are dismissed. The expression was originally a duck's egg, the shape of the 0. (The word 'love' in tennis has a similar origin - it is the English mispronunciation of l'oeuf - the French for 'the egg').

  3. Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 28,557
    #3

    Re: Duck's idiom.

    Diplomacy, you need to bookmark the OneLook Dictionary site.

    Most of the dictionaries listed there give that meaning of 'duck'.

    A batsman breaks his duck when he scores his first run, and this expression is also used figuratively.

    Rover

  4. BobK's Avatar
    Harmless drudge
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 15,917
    #4

    Re: Duck's idiom.

    But, in his/her defence, s/he may well not have known that Steve Finn was a cricketer (one who is not infrequently out for a duck - because batting's not his job [he's a bowler]); so that definition wouldn't have seemed relevant. Of course, in an ideal world the user of a dictionary should treat all meanings as possibly relevant, but without understanding the context it's hard to separate the wheat from the chaff.

    b

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •