Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. aachu's Avatar
    Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • Pakistan
      • Current Location:
      • Afghanistan

    • Join Date: Jun 2011
    • Posts: 191
    #1

    under what circumstances

    A few days ago I posted a question in the forum regarding the use of infinitive and gerund. The wording of my question was such that it didn't sound natural to me. Regarding the use of infinitive and gerund I wrote: "If we can use both; when an infinitive and when a gerund?" This second part of the sentence after the semicolon is what I am talking about.

    "When an infinitive and when a gerund".
    Is it natural?
    Can we use the following sentences to describe it?

    1. Under what conditions/circumstances do we use an infinitive and and under what conditions do we use a gerund?

    2. In what situations do we use an infinitive and in what situations do we use a gerund?

    How would a native speaker say it?

  2. aachu's Avatar
    Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • Pakistan
      • Current Location:
      • Afghanistan

    • Join Date: Jun 2011
    • Posts: 191
    #2

    Re: under what circumstances

    With apologies to Rover_KE, I am making another post here rather than editing my above post. The reason is I am unable to do so perhaps because I am using usingenglish.com through my mobile. There is no such option as 'edit post' with above post.

    I wanted to say this. It appears that I haven't been able to get my message across to the teachers. Dear teachers, I just wanted know if the following interrogative sentences are natural.
    (1) When do we use an infinitive
    and when a gerund?
    (2) Under what conditions do we use an infinitive and under what conditions a gerund?
    (3) In what situations do we use and infinitive and in what situations a gerund?
    (4) Under what circumstances do we use...
    I am not asking to answer these questions. Rather, I want to know if these interrogative sentences are correct or not.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 27,915
    #3

    Re: under what circumstances

    Quote Originally Posted by aachu View Post
    (1) When do we use an infinitive and when a gerund?
    (2) Under what conditions do we use an infinitive and under what conditions a gerund?
    (3) In what situations do we use and infinitive and in what situations a gerund?
    (4) Under what circumstances do we use...
    #1 is fine. #3 is fine; #2 and #4 don't sound very natural to me.

  4. konungursvia's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Academic
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 5,107
    #4

    Re: under what circumstances

    For 3), unfortunately, I don't see any general rule to guide you. Each verb has its own preference based on convention, style, habit, and all of that.

    For example 'intend' seems to require an infinitive and sounds unnatural with a gerund: He intends to study all weekend.

    'Enjoy' seems to have the opposite convention: She enjoys studying languages, but not She enjoys to study languages.

    'Like' can go either way: They like playing cricket. We like to play baseball.

  5. konungursvia's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Academic
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 5,107
    #5

    Re: under what circumstances

    Oh, now I see. Yes, they look all right.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •