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    #1

    at a high price

    Hello,

    Could someone tell me what phrase could be used instead of "high" in the following sentence if I wanted to make it sound more formal in a formal context:

    We bought the new flat at a high price.

    Thank you very much.
    heyt

  1. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: at a high price

    There's absolutely nothing wrong with using "high" in a formal context. It's always best to use a simple word in place of a complicated one - and especially in a "formal" context, when clarity is particularly important

    If you are really unhappy about using "high", then you could replace it with "considerable" or "substantial". However, I would strongly advise you to leave it as it is.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

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    #3

    Re: at a high price

    I agree with Grumpy, but if you feel the price was higher than the flat is probably worth, then you could say the price was "exorbitant" or "inflated".

    not a teacher

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    #4

    Re: at a high price

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    I agree with Grumpy, but if you feel the price was higher than the flat is probably worth, then you could say the price was "exorbitant" or "inflated".

    not a teacher
    Exorbitant and inflated imply that one has paid an unreasonably high price or one has been fleeced.
    High or low is relative to the market price of a property.
    You can say you bought the flat at 'above market price'.

    not a teacher
    Last edited by tedtmc; 30-Jan-2013 at 06:09.

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