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  1. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #1

    Can you believe this weather?

    What typ[ical replies do you get to this? I tried to google it, but didn't find any examples of replies. I suppose it might be "Yes, it's a nice day!" or "Yes, it's terrible!"

    Should one say "Yes" or just respond without it? How would you respond, could you give a few examples, please?
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Can you believe this weather?

    I wouldn't use "yes" at all.

    Oh my God! I know! Isn't it gorgeous out there?
    You said it! I bet we got more than a foot of snow!
    You must be from the South. It's really not that cold.
    Oh, I'll take this cold over the summer's heat any day.
    I know - I'm about to find Toto and head to the cellar.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Can you believe this weather?

    Blimey! I thought it was only we Brits who talk about the weather...
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Can you believe this weather?

    Everybody talks about it, but no one every does anything about it!
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Can you believe this weather?

    Quote Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
    Blimey! I thought it was only we Brits who talk about the weather...
    I am writing a booklet for Russian students studying English where I want to include some of the common phrases about the weather, not outdated like "It's raining cats and dogs", but the most typical ones. I've never come across the one I put in the title before.
    Last edited by englishhobby; 11-Feb-2013 at 09:06.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  6. probus's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Can you believe this weather?

    Raining cats and dogs is not at all outdated in my opinion. I like Tom Waits' raining hammers and nails but people look me askance when I use it. They prefer the cats and the dogs. Cats and dogs is still current usage.
    Last edited by probus; 11-Feb-2013 at 05:24.

  7. probus's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Can you believe this weather?

    The expression can you believe does not necessarily pertain to the weather.

    In AmE it is equivalent to "I can't believe", and always used scornfully or ironically.

    "I can't believe she wore that" = "Can you believe she wore that?"

    "Can you believe he had the nerve to do that?" = "I can't believe he had the nerve to do that."
    Last edited by probus; 11-Feb-2013 at 06:31. Reason: correct typo

  8. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Can you believe this weather?

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    The expression can you believe does not necessarily pertain to the weather.

    In AmE it is equivalent to "I can't believe", and always used scornfully or ironically.

    "I can't believe she wore that" = "Can you believe she wore that?"

    "Can you believe he had the nerve to do that?" = "I can't believe he had the nerve to do that."
    Thank you for the useful comment.

    Now I am beginning to wonder if the expression "Can you believe ..." is used in British English in this sense. ?
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

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    #9

    Re: Can you believe this weather?

    Quote Originally Posted by englishhobby View Post

    Now I am beginning to wonder if the expression "Can you believe ..." is used in British English in this sense.
    It certainly is!

    Rover

  9. 5jj's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Can you believe this weather?

    Can you believe that somebody might doubt this?

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