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  1. #1
    keannu's Avatar
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    The idea behind requirements, both for general education and majors

    1. By "the idea behind requirements", is the writer trying to say "requirements" realize broad or deep education or they don't?
    2. What do you mean by "distribution requirements"?
    *What's the opposite of "requirements" in college curriculum? "selections"?
    st52)The idea behind requirements, both for general education and majors, is that on their own students will not get a broad enough or deep enough education.They might specialize too narrowly or skim the surface too much. But remember that requirements are only trying to ensure a minimum of breadth and depth. There is no reason why you should merely fulfill requirements. Feel free to go beyond the offical requirements - take extra courses in your major or overfulfill distribution requirements..

  2. #2
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    Re: The idea behind requirements, both for general education and majors

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    1. By "the idea behind requirements", is the writer trying to say "requirements" realize broad or deep education or they don't?

    He says they do both. The idea behind requirements is to avoid the unfortunate choices that the writer suspects students might make if left to their own devices.

    2. What do you mean by "distribution requirements"?

    That would mean the enforced variety in students' course choices. They may not choose all math and science, or all English and history,for example. There is some minimal requirement that they choose at least some courses from various disciplines.

    *What's the opposite of "requirements" in college curriculum? "selections"?

    In America, it's electives. I don't know whether that term is used in British universities.

    st52)The idea behind requirements, both for general education and majors, is that on their own students will not get a broad enough or deep enough education.They might specialize too narrowly or skim the surface too much. But remember that requirements are only trying to ensure a minimum of breadth and depth. There is no reason why you should merely fulfill requirements. Feel free to go beyond the offical requirements - take extra courses in your major or overfulfill distribution requirements..
    .

  3. #3
    keannu's Avatar
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    Re: The idea behind requirements, both for general education and majors

    Thanks a lot! Wouldn't "distribution requirements" be equal to the concept of "electives"?
    I graduated from both a Korean university and a Canadian college. The former had "requirements", "electives in major", "electives in cultures", but I'm not sure if the terms are correct. At the Canadian college, where I studied computer science, there was no other option but "requirements" as the course was for getting a job.

  4. #4
    probus's Avatar
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    Re: The idea behind requirements, both for general education and majors

    I don't think distribution requirements are the same as electives. DR's mean, for example, you have to take at least one course from the humanities, one from the social sciences, one from math and science, etc. Electives, on the other hand, are free choices.

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