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  1. #1
    keannu's Avatar
    keannu is offline VIP Member
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    national code in their countries

    1. Does these "national code" and "native codes" both mean "officially adopted language"? "codes" sounds weird to me.
    2. What do you think this "human scene" mean? "human world" or "human place"?

    st109)In many parts of the world, speakers in bilingual communities have abandoned their native language in favor of their second language....For example, many Native American societies throughout North and South America have stopped speaking their own languages and have replaced them with the dominant national code in their countries. Replacement of native codes by dominant languages is usually a gradual process, first restricting natives languages to limited interactional spheres and eventually leading to their complete abandonment. Once replacement is complete, the native language disappears from the human scene, the classic language death.
    Last edited by keannu; 10-Mar-2013 at 15:44.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Re: national code in their countries

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    1. Does these "national code" and "native codes" both mean "officially adopted language"? "codes" sounds weird to me.
    2. What do you think this "human scene" mean? "human world" or "human place"?

    st109)In many parts of the world, speakers in bilingual communities have abandoned their native language in favor of their second language....For example, many Native American societies throughout North and South America have stopped speaking their own languages and have replaced them with the dominant national code in their countries. Replacement of native codes by dominant languages is usually a gradual process, first restricting natives languages to limited interactional spheres and eventually leading to their complete abandonment. Once replacement is complete, the native language disappears from the human scene, the classic language death.
    I've never heard "code" used in that context. The last sentence is nonsense.

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Re: national code in their countries

    It's used n the field of Applied Linguistics, but usualy with reference to different registers. People study the code-switching practised by school-children, speaking one way in the playground and another way in the classroom.

    Here's an illustration of what makes the last sentence nonsense. The last native-speaker of Cornish (using it as a 'mother-tongue' - learnt from the speaker's mother) died in 1777. But it has been resurrected more recently, and couldn't be described as having suffered a 'classic language death'.

    b

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Re: national code in their countries

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    1. Does these "national code" and "native codes" both mean "officially adopted language"? "codes" sounds weird to me.
    2. What do you think this "human scene" mean? "human world" or "human place"?

    st109)In many parts of the world, speakers in bilingual communities have abandoned their native language in favor of their second language....For example, many Native American societies throughout North and South America have stopped speaking their own languages and have replaced them with the dominant national code in their countries. Replacement of native codes by dominant languages is usually a gradual process, first restricting natives languages to limited interactional spheres and eventually leading to their complete abandonment. Once replacement is complete, the native language disappears from the human scene, the classic language death.
    1. The national code is the national language, English. The native code is the native language, eg. Navajo.
    2. Yes.

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