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  1. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #1

    Key keeper?

    Hello Forum,

    could you please tell me if the word I've written in the title is correct when used to refer to a person whose job is to sit in the hall of a university and give out (and take back) classroom keys to lecturers?

    My other question related to this word is more "cultural" than linguistic. It's about a little inconvenience I happen to face at the university where I work. As all the other lecturers, I often have to get the key of the audience from the key-keeper (or whatever is the word to call this person) and go upstairs to open the classoom for students. Then, after the lesson, I have to lock the room and go downstairs again to give the key I don't need any more back to the key keeper and take another one from her. We have two buildings at the university, one of them is old, so there's no lift in it and sometimes my colleagues and I have to go up and down the stairs of the four-storeyed building several times a day with the key. I don't mind the exercise))) But some of my colleagues are elderly people so they usually send one of their students to get the key (giving them their ID to show to the key-keeper so that she gave the students the key, though it's against the rule). I wonder if all the universities have a similar system, or, perhaps there is something more rational and not time and energy consuming (I've forgotten to mention that sometimes, when you come for the key it's not there because the person who has taken it hasn't brought it back yet, so time is wasted on waiting for the key (sometimes in vain). My question is how is this "key problem" solved in your universities (if such problem exists)?
    Last edited by englishhobby; 14-Mar-2013 at 17:50.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

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    #2

    Re: Kee keeper?

    "Key keeper" is as good a word as any.

    When I went to college, the rooms were open all the time, 24/7. So I don't have any experience with this type of system.

  2. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Kee keeper?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    "Key keeper" is as good a word as any.

    When I went to college, the rooms were open all the time, 24/7. So I don't have any experience with this type of system.
    Thank you, SoothingDave.
    And what if there is expensive equipment in the room (computers and so on)? It can be stolen if the room is not locked.)
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  3. CarloSsS's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Kee keeper?

    NOT A TEACHER
    I don't know if you're interested in an answer from someone like me, but I'll give it a try. At our university, the classrooms with expensive equipment (which is the majority of them) have, apart from the traditional key lock, an electronic card lock. Everybody who teaches and thus needs access to those rooms uses their card to open these rooms. As a result, there's no need to be running around the whole campus just to get a classroom open since every student and employee of the university is required to have such a card (among other things, the card proves that the person is attached to the university). Of course, if you're a student, the card won't open any door for you, while if you're say the dean, you'll probably have access to every classroom.

    P.S. You can change the title of the topic by editing your first post.
    Last edited by CarloSsS; 11-Mar-2013 at 23:12.
    Please note that I'm not a teacher.

  4. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Kee keeper?

    Thank you, CarloSsS, your reply is just what I needed. I think there's no need to change the topic as you gave me some very valuable information related to the word in question.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  5. Mr_Ben's Avatar
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      • Switzerland

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
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    #6

    Re: Kee keeper?


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