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  1. #1
    HanibalII is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    462

    Learnt/Learned to speak English

    I've honestly said this phrase so much to myself in the past 30 minutes, they no longer sound like words to me.

    So I'm asking any native English speaker (Preference to BrE) whether they would say 'I learned to speak English' or 'I learnt to speak English'.

    I took a look at a couple of the threads already posted, I read that 'learned' is American while 'learnt' is British.


    Cheers
    I'm not a teacher yet, but I am studying a Bachelor of Education with an English Literature major at Charles Sturt University, in NSW, Australia.

  2. #2
    angelene001 is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    250

    Re: Learnt/Learned to speak English

    NOT A TEACHER
    A LEARNER
    --------

    I've heard a Polish professor at university explaining that irregular verbs are slowly changing into regular ones. Those which are in the middle of the process still have both forms, regular and irregular. We usually use an irregular one to form participial adjectives.

    learned -> American
    learnt -> British

    shave -shaved -shaved
    shave - shaved - shaven

    clean-shaven (adj)


    I wonder what native speakers think about this explanation.

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