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    #1

    to-infinitive after "request"

    Hello everyone,

    According to the Oxford dictionary the constructions with "request" are as follows:

    request - Definition and pronunciation | Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary at OxfordLearnersDictionaries.com

    request (for something)| request (that…)

    But I've seen examples where to-infinitive is used:

    [ARCHIVED CONTENT] Testing for presence of (specified) Class A drugs on arrest and the expansion of the Restriction on Bail provisions | Home Office

    These are there to encourage problematic drug users to comply with the request to provide a sample for drug testing and with any requirement to attend an assessment so that they can be moved into appropriate treatment and support and away from crime

    Do I understand correctly that the construction "request + to-infinitive" is correct and just has not been included in the dictionary?

    Thank you.

  1. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to-infinitive after "request"

    The construction "request + to-infinitive" is correct beyond a shadow of doubt.

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    #3

    Re: to-infinitive after "request"

    Thank you, probus.

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    #4

    Re: to-infinitive after "request"

    As long as "request" is a noun, it's fine. It doesn't work if "request" is being used as a verb.

    I have made a request to sit my exams later than the other students.
    I request to sit my exams later than the other students.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: to-infinitive after "request"

    Thank you, emsr2d2.

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    #6

    Re: to-infinitive after "request"

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    As long as "request" is a noun, it's fine. It doesn't work if "request" is being used as a verb.

    I have made a request to sit my exams later than the other students.
    I request to sit my exams later than the other students.
    One of several possible exceptions would be with "have".

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: to-infinitive after "request"

    Quote Originally Posted by billmcd View Post
    One of several possible exceptions would be with "have".
    I am being rather dense today. Could you explain that, please.

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    #8

    Re: to-infinitive after "request"

    I think Billmcd means something like: I request to have my breakfast in my room.

    I think the verb request is fine with an infinitive provided it has a definite object, for example you. Here are couple of examples from the [bnc] British National Corpus

    Colonel, I must request you to keep your distance.
    Again and again I request you to be merry, if anything troubles your hearts, or vex your souls, neglect and contemn it, let it pass.


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    #9

    Re: to-infinitive after "request"

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    I think Billmcd means something like: I request to have my breakfast in my room.
    That doesn't sound natural to me.
    I think the verb request is fine with an infinitive provided it has a definite object[...]:

    Colonel, I must request you to keep your distance.
    Fine, but that does not mean that 'I request (verb) to do ...' is acceptable.

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