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  1. #1
    tolerant squirell is offline Newbie
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    Question Famous, well-known, celebrated, distinguished, eminent

    I'm struggling with a little strange test. Take a look at one of the questions.

    France is ..... for its fine food and wine.
    1) famous 2) well-known(correct) 3) celebrated 4) distinguished 5) eminent

    Shouldn't the others be more or less legal too? I'm sure 'famous' cannot be wrong in this case.

    Are there any special rules for these words?

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Famous, well-known, celebrated, distinguished, eminent

    I would have chosen 1)- this is not a good test question IMO.

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: Famous, well-known, celebrated, distinguished, eminent

    Quote Originally Posted by tolerant squirell View Post
    I'm struggling with a little strange test. Take a look at one of the questions.

    France is ..... for its fine food and wine.
    1) famous 2) well-known(correct) 3) celebrated 4) distinguished 5) eminent

    Shouldn't the others be more or less legal too? I'm sure 'famous' cannot be wrong in this case.

    Are there any special rules for these words?
    Welcome to the forum.
    I think it's an unfair test question. Both 1) and 2) are perfectly acceptable and 3) is also possible. 4) and 5) don't work.
    Note that we don't say that English grammar/vocabulary is "legal". There are no laws about what words you can and can't use in a sentence. Legal documents must use specific terminology in order for the document to be legally binding but in normal English, there are no "laws".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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