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  1. #1
    jasonlulu_2000 is offline Senior Member
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    widely or wildly

    Margaret Thatcher's was a towering global figure who made a vast impact. Her reputation is widely immensely high.

    Margaret Thatcher's was a towering global figure who made a vast impact. Her reputation is wildly immensely high.

    I cannot make out the word on the radio. Is it "widely" or "wildly"?

    Thanks!

    Jason

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: widely or wildly

    Quote Originally Posted by jasonlulu_2000 View Post
    Margaret Thatcher's was a towering global figure who made a vast impact. Her reputation is widely immensely high.

    Margaret Thatcher's was a towering global figure who made a vast impact. Her reputation is wildly immensely high.

    I cannot make out the word on the radio. Is it "widely" or "wildly"?

    Thanks!

    Jason
    Given that both sentences are quite unnatural and don't sound like they were created by a native speaker, it's hard to tell which one. I wouldn't expect to hear "wildly" in a news broadcast, particularly in a serious context so I imagine it's "widely". However, "widely immensely high" is terrible English, as are "Margaret Thatcher's was ..." and "vast impact".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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