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  1. #1
    Pooya is offline Newbie
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    Help with clarifying ambiguity of meaning of two sentences

    Hi!

    Below, I cannot understand the meanings of two boldfaced sentences.

    (1) You’d be forgiven for thinking me mad, the way I acted yesterday.
    The truth is I feel rather light headed and foolish in your presence, and (2) I don’t think I can blame the heat.

    Would you please explain it to me?

  2. #2
    SlickVic9000's Avatar
    SlickVic9000 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Help with clarifying ambiguity of meaning of two sentences

    (Not a Teacher)

    1) That's just a really fancy way of saying, "You must have thought I was crazy."

    2) In later stages of heat exhaustion, people begin to hallucinate and act irrationally. He's saying here that his behavior can't be blamed on this.

  3. #3
    Pooya is offline Newbie
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    Re: Help with clarifying ambiguity of meaning of two sentences

    Thank you. Then, with regard to the sentences, are these two equal? "thinking me mad" = you thought that I am mad

  4. #4
    SlickVic9000's Avatar
    SlickVic9000 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Help with clarifying ambiguity of meaning of two sentences

    (Not a Teacher)

    Yes.

    "You'd be forgiven for thinking me mad." = "You must have thought that I was mad."

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