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    #1

    Unhappy extrapolate to

    This equation is a further definition of two-phase viscosity; it does not extrapolate to the vapour phase viscosity as the mass x approches unity.

    Hi every body;

    I want to know what does mean the verb "extrapolate to".
    If it means to use the conclutions for "vapour phase viscosity" or it means to compare the results (which got from anothe analys)?

    Thanks

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: extrapolate to

    Don't dictionaries help? Which have you tried

    b

    PS The word is 'approaches', 'everybody' is one word, and your last sentence would be much more meaningful if you took some care over it. .

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    #3

    Re: extrapolate to

    :)
    Thanks for bearing my terrible poor English.
    Anyway I'm in trouble with" to extrapolate" I know that it means taking derived conclutions from some analyses into anther ones so I want to know if it means that that equation can not be used for the vapuor viscosity or what ?:(

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    #4

    Re: extrapolate to

    To extrapolate means to predict a trend outside of the area in which you have measured.

    An example, say you measure the time it takes for a car to come to a complete stop, as a function of its speed. And you find the following values:

    10mph - 1 second
    20mph - 2 seconds
    30mph - 3 seconds
    40mph - 4 seconds

    Now you can estimate the time it takes for a car at 80mph, (8 seconds). This is called extrapolating.

    In your example (I need more text to fully understand what it's about), it says that the formula can only describes two-phase viscosity, and it cannot be applied to vapor phase viscosity.

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