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    #1

    a person booked on the flight

    Would it be correct to say "I've got an emergency. I need to be booked on the flight to Zurich"? It's just I haven't heard before that a person can be booked on a flight.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a person booked on the flight

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    Would it be correct to say "I've got an emergency. I need to be booked on the flight to Zurich"? It's just I haven't heard before that a person can be booked on a flight.
    It's not natural. However, a person could be booked on a flight.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: a person booked on the flight

    I find it very natural.

    I'm booked on the 1215 from Gatwick to Madrid.
    They're booked on the first flight to Edinburgh.
    He's booked on the inaugural flight to the North Pole.
    I have to get to New York urgently. Book me on the first flight you can.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: a person booked on the flight

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I find it very natural.

    I'm booked on the 1215 from Gatwick to Madrid.
    They're booked on the first flight to Edinburgh.
    He's booked on the inaugural flight to the North Pole.
    I have to get to New York urgently. Book me on the first flight you can.
    "I've got an emergency. I need to be booked on the flight to Zurich" Do you really find this natural?

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: a person booked on the flight

    If a boss were talking to his/her secretary/assistant, yes. It would mean the same as "I need you to book me on a flight to Zurich".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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