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  1. saloom2's Avatar
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    #1

    On their age/ their age.

    hello everyone,


    That part in English really is confusing me. I want to say

    when children are at school, they always get to know children on their age/ their age.

    I know it's the latter, but why so?
    I wish I had better English, but I work hard to improve it. I'm studying for IGCSE, so I'm only interested in BrE.

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    #2

    Re: On their age/ their age.

    Quote Originally Posted by saloom2 View Post
    hello everyone,


    That part in English really is confusing me. I want to say

    when children are at school, they always get to know children on their age/ their age.

    I know it's the latter, but why so?
    I was on a bus. I was on the beach. I was on the train. I was standing on the street. How would "on" work in reference to age?

  2. saloom2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: On their age/ their age.

    So, Their age without any preposition. Right?
    I wish I had better English, but I work hard to improve it. I'm studying for IGCSE, so I'm only interested in BrE.

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    #4

    Re: On their age/ their age.

    It's more natural to say '...they get to know other children of their own age'.

    We do use the construction [pronoun]+'age', but like this:

    A: 'I met Bob Downe today. How old will he be?'

    B: 'He's my age; we went to school together.'

    Rover

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: On their age/ their age.

    Quote Originally Posted by saloom2 View Post
    So, "their age" without any preposition. Right?
    I would prefer "their own age" meaning "the same age as them".

    I can't think of any expressions to do with age which take "on", other than perhaps "on his sixtieth birthday" but there the preposition refers to the date.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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