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  1. #1
    Winwin2011 is offline Senior Member
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    difference between exam and exams

    If a friend of mine finished his lawyer exam (4 papers) last moth, I would ask him “How was your exam?” Am I correct?

    If a friend of mine finished his lawyer exam (4 papers) and CPA exam (5 papers) last month, I would ask him “How were your exams?” Am I correct?

    Is it correct to say “I am studying for the coming Lawyer exam”, if there are 4 papers to take?

    Is it correct to say “I am studying for the coming exams for Lawyer and CPA".?

    Thanks.





    Last edited by Winwin2011; 22-Apr-2013 at 19:13.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: difference between exam and exams

    It depends whether there is one single exam, during which four papers have to be written or if it's effectively four separate exams.

    If it were four papers done on four different days, but all leading to one exam result, I would probably ask "How did all the papers for your exam go?"
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. #3
    Winwin2011 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: difference between exam and exams

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    It depends whether there is one single exam, during which four papers have to be written or if it's effectively four separate exams.

    If it were four papers done on four different days, but all leading to one exam result, I would probably ask "How did all the papers for your exam go?"
    Thanks, ems.

    I’m very sorry that I was editing my post when you replied. There’s some problem on my computer.

    After reading your reply, I think it is correct to say “I am studying for the coming Lawyer examif it were four papers done on four different days, but all leading to one exam result.

    Could I ask you the following additional questions, please?

    Is it correct to say “I am studying for the coming exams for Lawyer and CPA?

    If I were in the Secondary school, which of the following sentences is correct?

    1. I’m studying for the coming exam.
    2. I’m studying for the coming exams.

    Please note that I am confused about the difference between the singular and plural forms of exam.

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: difference between exam and exams

    The main problem with your questions is that you need "forthcoming" or "upcoming", not "coming".

    If you're in secondary school, I assume you're studying lots of different subjects and that each one has a final exam. If that's the case, then "I'm studying for the/my upcoming exams". If you're studying to be a lawyer, then I would expect "I'm studying for the bar [exam]". However, I'm in the UK and I have no idea if law exams work the same in other countries.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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