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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    This theft will not be tolerated

    Does this "will not be" denote present willingness or future one? Sounds like a present one, but I'm not sure.

    p17)Once there was a poor man who had only potatoes to eat. Each dinner he
    would sit beneath his wealthy neighbor's kitchen window and breathe in mouth-watering aromas coming from the window. This seemed to lend favor to his own plain meal. The wealthy man eventually discovered the poor man's habit. "This theft will not be tolerated!" he thundered. He dragged the poor man to a village elder for advice, and insisted that his neighbor pay for the privilege of enjoying the smells. The poor man said, "I cannot pay because all I own is my dog." "An equal exchange is a solution," said the village elder. "From now on, you shall be free to smell his dog whenever you wish."

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    #2

    Re: This theft will not be tolerated

    I would say that this has become idiomatic. It means both present and future unwillingness to tolerate this and while it could as well be told in the present tense (used for general statements) it has somehow become established to use the future (also to stress the point - there also exists "We are not going to tolerate this!", but I think the use of "will" makes the message clearer and stronger).

    By the way, a very nice little story with a clear message. Is that yours?
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 23-Apr-2013 at 08:44. Reason: Deleting the apostrophe from "your's".

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: This theft will not be tolerated

    'Will' is sometimes used to express a rule or command. It is when used by someone with enough authority, an extension of 'will' expressing certainty.

    @ dejavecue. There is no apostrophe in yours.
    Last edited by 5jj; 23-Apr-2013 at 08:13.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: This theft will not be tolerated

    Incidentally, there is a typo in the story: the smells didn't lend favor (whatever that might mean), they lent savo[u]r. As 'savo[u]r' is a little-used word (especially as a noun), maybe a spellchecker 'corrected' it.

    b

  4. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: This theft will not be tolerated

    Maybe the OP meant to have written "flavor"?
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: This theft will not be tolerated

    Possibly, though the collocation lend/flavo[u]r isn't strong; the usual collocation with 'flavo[u]r' is 'add': here are the first five hits in BNC vor any verb + 'flavour':

    1 ADD FLAVOUR 6
    2 MELLOW FLAVOUR 4
    3 BECOMING FLAVOUR 2
    4 ENHANCES FLAVOUR 2
    5 IS FLAVOUR 2
    ...
    And here are the last two:
    ...
    37 ADDS FLAVOUR 1
    38 ADDED FLAVOUR 1
    (A total of 8 hits [out of 51 in all] makes this a pretty strong collocation.)

    On the other hand, there were no hits in BNC for either 'lend flavour' or 'lend savour'; I think the latter sounds appropriately literary for this sort of fable.

    b

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