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  1. #1
    Winwin2011 is offline Senior Member
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    make arrangements vs make an arrangement

    Do the following sentences have a difference?

    I want to make an arrangement for my boss’s trip to China.

    I want to make arrangements for my boss’s trip to China.
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: make arrangements vs make an arrangement

    The first is unnatural. We usually refer to "making arrangements" in this context. "Making an arrangement" is possible in other contexts.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. #3
    HanibalII is offline Member
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    Re: make arrangements vs make an arrangement

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Do the following sentences have a difference?

    I want to make an arrangement for my boss’s trip to China.

    I want to make arrangements for my boss’s trip to China.
    Thanks.
    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    The first is unnatural. We usually refer to "making arrangements" in this context. "Making an arrangement" is possible in other contexts.

    I'm not sure with that. To me,both sentences could have slightly different meanings.

    'I want to make an arrangement for my boss's trip to China' could mean getting the ticket and that's it. While
    'I want to make arrangements for my boss's trip to China' has a plural meaning. It could be interpreted as meaning everything from the ticket, to the taxi to the airport, to the accommodation. That's just my opinion on the sentences though.

    I believe either sentence is natural, however the first would require further context stating which arrangement in my opinion.
    I'm not a teacher yet, but I am studying a Bachelor of Education with an English Literature major at Charles Sturt University, in NSW, Australia.

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: make arrangements vs make an arrangement

    If I were only arranging one part of my boss's trip to China, I wouldn't refer to it as "making an arrangement". If I only had one responsibility, I would name it:

    I want/have to organise my boss's transport to the airport for his trip to China.
    I want/have to book my boss's airline ticket to China.
    I want/have to check my boss's passport is still valid ready for his trip to China.


    If I were responsible for the whole trip, then I would say:

    I want to make [the] arrangements for my boss's trip to China.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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