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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
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      • India
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    • Join Date: Apr 2013
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    #1

    To/For

    "The politician filed a formal application to the mayor of the city to allow him to perform prayers obligatory for Muslims during his working hours."

    Can we write it as,
    "T
    he politician filed a formal application to the mayor of the city for allowing him to perform prayers obligatory for Muslims during his working hours."?

    Any grammatical mistake?
    How can i learn where to use "to" and where to use "for"?
    Thanks

    • Member Info
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      • American English
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    #2

    Re: To/For

    No, use "to" here.

    I would use "with the mayor."

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: To/For

    If you would use "with the mayor",then meaning will change.won't it?

    Because mayor is not with politician in filing the complaint.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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      • UK
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    #4

    Re: To/For

    No. We lodge an application "with" an office or "with" an official. If you want to ask the mayor for permission to do something, you lodge your application "with the mayor" or "with the mayor's office".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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