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    #1

    Object of which verb?

    Hi,

    She tried to convince herself that there was nothing to get afraid of.

    The bold part is a noun clause, functioning as object of verb. But which verb? Is it 'try' or 'convince'?


    Thanks.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Object of which verb?

    Quote Originally Posted by HifaMo View Post
    Hi,

    She tried to convince herself that there was nothing to get afraid of.

    The bold part is a noun clause, functioning as object of verb. But which verb? Is it 'try' or 'convince'?


    Thanks.
    It's a poor sentence. "get" doesn't work there.

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    #3

    Re: Object of which verb?

    I am not interested in the sentence itself.

    She tried to convince herself that everything was fine.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Object of which verb?

    Quote Originally Posted by HifaMo View Post
    I am not interested in the sentence itself.
    Then neither are we.

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    #5

    Re: Object of which verb?

    What does it mean to correct a small part of a sentence, neglecting the main interest of the thread?

    I think it is immoral. Correcting a small error in a thread should be an addition. Are you playing on learner's feelings?

    Being a teacher or native speaker of a language, that other people are learning, doesn't permit one to be disrespectful.
    Please, delete my membership.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Object of which verb?

    It is very simple. Until the sentence is grammatically correct, there is no point trying to deal with any questions. Even though your question was about the part in bold, there was a glaring error in the second part which, in my opinion, should be fixed before we can deal with the whole thing as a grammatically correct sentence.

    We are not playing on your feelings. This is what we do. We read a sentence. If it's wrong, we point out that there is an error. We wait for the learner to try to correct it. If it turns out that the learner is not able to correct it, then after a while, we correct it.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: Object of which verb?

    Quote Originally Posted by HifaMo View Post
    She tried to convince herself that there was nothing to get afraid of.
    The bold part is a noun clause, functioning as object of verb. But which verb? Is it 'try' or 'convince'?
    My question is clear, and can be answered without correcting that small mistake, which can be corrected in red in the quotation.

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    It's a poor sentence. "get" doesn't work there.
    There is no need to say 'get doesn't work there' without answering the question, which is very disappointing.

    I am no longer interested in that question, and I don't have more time to waste.
    Everything is obvious.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Object of which verb?

    I note that when you started this thread, you had already made 43 posts on the forum. During that time, I would have thought you would have noted how the forum works. Unless someone is a complete beginner, we rarely just hand out the answers. We also try to correct the small mistakes which appear in the posts by learners whose level is actually quite good. I would put you in that category. All your posts in this thread have shown a fairly high level of English. That's why we're not just giving out answers. You are at a level where, if we point out that there is a mistake, we encourage you to fix it yourself. The same goes for your original question. Which verb do you think it is, and why?

    In the end, everyone's time was wasted in this thread. Had you simply changed "get" to the correct word and then shown that you had attempted to answer the question yourself, we probably would have got a lot further than this in the space of 8 posts.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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