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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Get Out Of Meeting, Inning

    (This is a substantially modified version of another question)

    Assume that a director was attending a meeting, and a pitcher was in a baseball game in some inning:


    1 "He got out of the meeting. (work)"
    2 "The pitcher got out of the inning. (baseball)"

    For sentence 1, does it mean that he completed the attendance of the meeting, or left the meeting before the end of the meeting? For sentence 2, does it mean that he completed the inning, or left before the end of the inning? It seems that when somebody 'gets out of' something, that something may or may not be finished.
    Last edited by comhe; 03-May-2013 at 05:14.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Get Out Of Meeting, Inning

    1. I assume he didn't have to go.
    2. Do you understand baseball? The pitcher got into some trouble in the inning. Maybe runners were on 2 or 3 bases, in scoring position. However, he managed to get three outs without a run scoring, so he got [out of trouble regarding] the inning.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: Get Out Of Meeting, Inning

    For the first sentence, assume that he was in the meeting at the beginning. The question has also be slightly modified.

  4. probus's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Get Out Of Meeting, Inning

    Okay, tell us what modification it needs.

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    #5

    Re: Get Out Of Meeting, Inning

    The modifed portion is underlined.

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Get Out Of Meeting, Inning

    You can't tell. It doesn't seem a likely thing to say in that scenario.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. probus's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Get Out Of Meeting, Inning

    To amplify on BarbD's first response: in areas other than baseball "to get out of something" means to avoid doing something you don't want to do. If he was in at the beginning, I think it simply means he left the meeting.

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    #8

    Re: Get Out Of Meeting, Inning

    Quote Originally Posted by comhe View Post
    (This is a substantially modified version of another question)

    Assume that a director was attending a meeting, and a pitcher was in a baseball game in some inning:


    1 "He got out of the meeting. (work)"
    2 "The pitcher got out of the inning. (baseball)"

    For sentence 1, does it mean that he completed the attendance of the meeting, or left the meeting before the end of the meeting? For sentence 2, does it mean that he completed the inning, or left before the end of the inning? It seems that when somebody 'gets out of' something, that something may or may not be finished.




    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    To amplify on BarbD's first response: in areas other than baseball "to get out of something" means to avoid doing something you don't want to do. If he was in at the beginning, I think it simply means he left the meeting.
    If that was the meaning, I'd say it's incorrect. The more natural way of saying it would just be 'he left the meeting.'

    I'd say the meaning is, there was a meeting on, but he wasn't required to go so 'he got out of the meeting.'
    I'm not a teacher yet, but I am studying a Bachelor of Education with an English Literature major at Charles Sturt University, in NSW, Australia.

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    #9

    Re: Get Out Of Meeting, Inning

    Interesting. I was thinking of things like "I got out of doing the dishes", which in AmE means I escaped from doing something I didn't want to do.

  9. Newbie
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    #10

    Re: Get Out Of Meeting, Inning

    Does anyone think that there is a substantial difference between "to get out of the meeting" and "to get out of attending a meeting"?
    Last edited by comhe; 03-May-2013 at 06:06.

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