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    #1

    Is this analysis right?

    1. He lost nearly ten pounds.
    This sentence means that he has lost money, and the amount of lost money is nearly ten pounds, ie 8 or 9 pounds that is close to 10. And, the adverb "nearly" in here modifies "ten pounds".

    2. He nearly lost ten pounds.
    This sentence means that he did not lose ten pounds. This even was unaccomplished or uncommitted. In here the word "nearly" modifies "lost".

    Do I comprehend right?
    Thanks.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Is this analysis right?

    Yes.

    Bear in mind that we also use "pounds" when referring to someone's weight. If someone says "I've lost nearly/almost ten pounds" I would assume they meant that they were on a diet or a healthy eating plan, trying to lose some weight and that so far he had lost just over nine pounds in weight.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: Is this analysis right?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Yes.

    Bear in mind that we also use "pounds" when referring to someone's weight. If someone says "I've lost nearly/almost ten pounds" I would assume they meant that they were on a diet or a healthy eating plan, trying to lose some weight and that so far he had lost just over nine pounds in weight.
    Thank you, ems. I know what you mean now.

    But it seems that adverb is not as usual as adjective to be used to modify noun. Is there any guidance regarding modifying noun with adverb or adjective? And, on what occasion is an adjective put behind a noun which it is modifying?

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