Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Feb 2013
    • Posts: 101
    #1

    red shining candles

    Hi,

    What is the meaning of "red shining candles"?

    1. the color of the candles is red and the candles are burning brightly.

    2. the candles are burning brightly and the light that is emitted from the candle seems red.

    I guess both are right and you decide the meaning from the context.

    Thanks in advance.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #2

    Re: red shining candles

    I'm sure the light itself is not red. Using "shining" to describe a flame is not usual. I suspect that the candles themselves are red in color and have a shiny surface.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Feb 2013
    • Posts: 101
    #3

    Re: red shining candles

    Thank you, SoothingDave.

    Let me ask you what you say to describe a candle that emits bright light when being lit.

    Thanks in advance.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #4

    Re: red shining candles

    Quote Originally Posted by taked4700 View Post
    Thank you, SoothingDave.

    Let me ask you what you say to describe a candle that emits bright light when being lit.

    Thanks in advance.
    Normal.

    I may have spoken too broadly. It just struck me as odd. I think you could describe the candles as "shining" or "brilliant." But I would not do so at the same time I was calling them "red" as was done in your original sentence.

    "The red candles were shining" sounds fine to me. "There were red, shining candles" does not.

    Since the "shining" is really describing the flame and not the candle, stacking the adjectives "red" and "shining" together introduces confusion.

    As you asked, it makes it seem like the flame is red. The candle is red, the flame is shining.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Feb 2013
    • Posts: 101
    #5

    Re: red shining candles

    Excuse my confusion.

    "A brightly shining candle" is idiomatic to mean a candle that emits bright light when being lit.

    Is this correct?

    Thanks in advance.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #6

    Re: red shining candles

    Yes.

  1. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #7

    Re: red shining candles

    Quote Originally Posted by taked4700 View Post
    Excuse my confusion.

    "A brightly shining candle" is idiomatic to mean a candle that emits bright light when being lit.

    Is this correct?

    Thanks in advance.
    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Yes.
    BNC has no instances of 'brightly shining + <noun>'. COCA does have 7, none of them 'candle'. (Of course, language is much more productive than any corpus can be...)

    In Br Eng, rather than talking about 'a brightly shining candle' we talk about 'a candle burning brightly'.

    b

  2. Route21's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Thailand

    • Join Date: Nov 2010
    • Posts: 938
    #8

    Re: red shining candles

    "BNC has no instances of 'brightly shining + <noun>'."

    Does this mean BNC doesn't recognise "brightly shining star/light/lamp"?

    Regards
    R21

  3. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #9

    Re: red shining candles

    Quote Originally Posted by Route21 View Post
    "BNC has no instances of 'brightly shining + <noun>'."

    Does this mean BNC doesn't recognise "brightly shining star/light/lamp"?

    Regards
    R21
    No it doesn't. But I'd expect something described as 'idiomatic' to appear there. Generally, a corpus doesn't (and can't) recognize things, it just records them. A native-speaker couldn't say 'Good grief, I've stopped speaking English. What I've just said isn't in BNC!' If s/he could, it would mean BNC was infinitely big.

    b

    No it doesn't, although if something was idiomatic I'd expect it to show up in this sort of corpus. Corpora, generally, don't recognize things; they just record things. If I could say

  4. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #10

    Re: red shining candles

    Afterthought: I just happened to be using BNC and COCA today, and while I was there I looked at the relative frequencies of 'shining brightly' versus 'brightly shining' in the two corpora. BNC (the smaller of the two) has 13/0; COCA (much bigger, and including AE usage) has 56/8. This is not to say that 'brightly shining' is wrong, or even less acceptable; but it occurs less frequently. My WAG ('wild guess' with a silent A) is that some word used by immigrants to the USA (Chinese? - dunno; my education is seriously flawed in that area ) translates as 'brightly shining', which would account for that order being more common in AE (1 in 7) than in BE (negligble).

    b

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Difference between "Light candles" and "Lit candles"
    By TheShadow in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-Dec-2012, 22:36
  2. [Grammar] Lit or lighted candles
    By colleensparis in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-Feb-2010, 12:54
  3. candles in/on it
    By Tan Elaine in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Jul-2009, 08:42
  4. [General] to bat for, shining you on
    By dilermando in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 19-Aug-2008, 02:45

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •