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  1. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Feb 2006
    • Posts: 9
    #1

    what is the different between .....

    Dear all teachers,
    i'm a student in China,i don't know what the different between the remember+gurend and the remember+inf.........
    and could you give another example to me(what words have different beweent the gurend and inf.)
    thx~

    Best regards
    helen

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Sep 2004
    • Posts: 566
    #2

    Re: what is the different between .....

    Quote Originally Posted by helen7b
    Dear all teachers,
    i'm a student in China,i don't know what the different between the remember+gurend and the remember+inf.........
    and could you give another example to me(what words have different beweent the gurend and inf.)
    thx~
    Best regards
    helen
    Welcome to UE, Helen, and please allow me to try to help out.
    Indeed, there's a difference in meaning between the two structures: 'remember' + gerund vs. 'remember' + inf.
    We use the first structure when we refer to situations, actions, events, etc. that actually happened in the past, for example:
    "I remember locking the door" - means that the speaker recalls the fact of locking the door as an activity once performed.
    On the other hand the
    "I remember to lock the door" statement is an assurance, on the part of the speaker, that he/she does bear in mind that it will be necessary to lock the door at some future point of time.
    The second structure is often used when giving orders or instructions, in the following manner:
    "Helen, please remember to order some printer paper, we're running out of it".
    The verb 'stop' is yet another example of a verb that when used in collocation with a gerund or an infinitive has a different meaning.
    'I stopped typing the message' means that the activity of typing was interrupted because, for example, the speaker had to do something else.
    When used with an infinitive, however, the verb 'stop' means that the previously performed activity was stopped and the speaker proceeded with something else, the newly taken action being indicated by the infinitive:
    'I stopped to type the message' ('I stopped talking to my roommate, drinking coffee, etc., to do something else, to type the message in this case').
    There are many more verbs that behave similarly.
    I hope the above helps.
    Regards,
    Tee Kay
    Last edited by Tomasz Klimkiewicz; 23-Feb-2006 at 13:38.

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