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    #1

    be released from duty?

    I read a book written by a Japanese English teacher. The book says, the phrased "be released from duty" means "come off duty, get off duty, or go off duty." Since I'm a doubting Thomas, I'd like to seek language experts' opinions. Thanks a lot.

    maoyueh

  1. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: be released from duty?

    What are your doubts?

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    #3

    Re: be released from duty?

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    What are your doubts?
    Hi probus,

    Thank you for your quick response. My doubts are as follows:
    I think that "be released from duty" and "come/get/go off duty" do not mean the same, because people "come/get/go off duty" usually at the end of a day, but if they "are released from duty," they are allowed to spend a period of time away from their work, or are allowed to leave their jobs. For example, "She was released from her teaching duties to attend the funeral." This means, she might have a couple of days off from duty. Another example, "He was released from duty with The Far Eastern Textile Company." In this case, he no longer keeps that job. That's why I need your professional opinions. Thank you.
    maoyueh

  2. Route21's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: be released from duty?

    As an NES but not a teacher:

    To be released from an obligation you have to have been "bound" by that obligation.

    You can be released from an obligation to attend a funeral or at termination of employment, for whatever reason.

    You would not, normally, expect to need to be released from an obligation at the end of your shift etc, unless you were obliged to stay on until your relief arrived and they didn't show up.

    Regards
    R21

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