Results 1 to 9 of 9
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Sep 2009
    • Posts: 123
    #1

    a way of greeting

    Hello everyone,
    Could anyone please tell me the word ( either the noun or verb) for a way of greeting which was common among women probably in the Victorian era; In this type of greeting the woman with both hands holds up her long skirt just a little bit off the ground to show respect for someone she has just met.

    Thanks in advance

  1. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #2

    Re: a way of greeting

    Quote Originally Posted by shabani View Post
    Could anyone please tell me the word ( either the noun or verb) for a way of greeting which was common among women probably in the Victorian era; In this type of greeting the woman with both hands holds up her long skirt just a little bit off the ground to show respect for someone she has just met.
    That's new to me. Where did you hear of this?

  2. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #3

    Re: a way of greeting

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    That's new to me. Where did you hear of this?
    And to me.

    b

    PS On the subject of greetings, you might find this interesting (though it doesn't answer your question).

  3. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #4

    Re: a way of greeting

    It's just occurred to me that shabani may be referring to a curtsey.

  4. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #5

    Re: a way of greeting

    Very likely. And s/he'll note from that link that it can be both a noun and a verb. It was the 'Victorian' that led me astray; people still curtsey today, though not so often, in either very formal or theatrical contexts. My sister (in the early sixties, in the days when schoolchildren knew the meaning of respect ) was expected to curtsey whenever she met a teacher (it was a very slight bending at the knee, and momentary touching of the hem, called 'bobbing a curtsey').

    b

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,312
    #6

    Re: a way of greeting

    I believe the skirt was originally lifted to facilitate the movement of the legs during the curtsy. Then it became ceremonial.

    Note that my browser likes this spelling.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,109
    #7

    Re: a way of greeting

    I think the essential nature of a curtsey is that you are lowering yourself before another person, as in bowing. My guess is that holding up their dress was to avoid it getting muddy. With short dresses, they are still held, but outwards.
    Images Search

  6. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #8

    Re: a way of greeting

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Very likely. And s/he'll note from that link that it can be both a noun and a verb. It was the 'Victorian' that led me astray
    Me too. I am guessing that shabani may have seen some film/TV adaptation of aJane Austen novel .Here's how it was done formally a few years ago.
    My sister (in the early sixties, in the days when schoolchildren knew the meaning of respect ) was expected to curtsey whenever she met a teacher (it was a very slight bending at the knee, and momentary touching of the hem, called 'bobbing a curtsey').
    I used to feel very embarrassed as a young teacher in Germany in the sixties when the 13-year-old daughter of the (rather old-fashioned) headmaster of my school would 'knicksen' (bob a curtsey) if we met in the corridor.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Sep 2009
    • Posts: 123
    #9

    Re: a way of greeting

    Thank you all,
    Yes, That's exactly what I was looking for. The reason I thought it's no longer used is that I've only seen it in old movies.
    And thank you for the links, they were very useful.

Similar Threads

  1. [General] Appropriate greeting?
    By lehoa in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 28-Jun-2010, 02:25
  2. Welcome greeting
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-Dec-2008, 14:07
  3. Greeting
    By Dinhtuong in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 15-Nov-2007, 12:25
  4. Greeting
    By Dinhtuong in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 15-Nov-2007, 12:21
  5. greeting
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2004, 12:18

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •