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    #1

    fit in - get around to

    I hardly ever fit in time to clean my room up.
    I hardly ever get around to cleaning my room up.

    Do these two phrasal verbs mean the same in this kind of context and do you use them without any particular difference when they mean "to find the time to do something"?

    Thank you all.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: fit in - get around to

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    I hardly ever fit in time to clean my room up.
    I hardly ever get around to cleaning my room up.

    Do these two phrasal verbs mean the same in this kind of context and do you use them without any particular difference when they mean "to find the time to do something"?

    Thank you all.
    I don't find the first one natural.

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    #3

    Re: fit in - get around to

    In which kind of context would you use the first one?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: fit in - get around to

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    In which kind of context would you use the first one?
    Do you mean how would I use "fit in"?

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: fit in - get around to

    As has been said, the second of your examples is fine.

    Your first example seems to be a mixture of two phrases:

    I hardly ever make time to clean my room.
    I can never fit cleaning my room into my schedule.

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    #6

    Re: fit in - get around to

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    I hardly ever fit in time to clean my room up......because I am too busy with other things.
    I hardly ever get around to cleaning my room up. (Same as above, but with a slight inference that it is not really a priority for you.)
    Do these two phrasal verbs mean the same in this kind of context and do you use them without any particular difference when they mean "to find the time to do something"?

    Thank you all.
    b.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: fit in - get around to

    I'd say it's more than an inference. I can watch TV for six hours and not get around to doing a boring chore. I could have fit it into my schedule. But I just never got around to it.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: fit in - get around to

    The two mean different things to me too. If I can't fit something in, it's because I was too busy doing other important things. If I don't get around to something, it's just that it was on my list of things to do but I didn't get that far in my list (usually with me, I didn't even start my list!)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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