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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    "pull over" for the bus?

    Can you say "pull over" for the bus stopping at the station? Don't you just say "The bus stopped at the station"?
    I don't think "The bus pulled over at the station" works.

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    #2

    Re: "pull over" for the bus?

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Can you say "pull over" for the bus stopping at the station? Don't you just say "The bus stopped at the station"?
    I don't think "The bus pulled over at the station" works.
    It works for me but I would probably say "The bus pulled into the station".

  2. Amigos4's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "pull over" for the bus?

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Can you say "pull over" for the bus stopping at the station? Don't you just say "The bus stopped at the station"?
    I don't think "The bus pulled over at the station" works.
    "The bus stopped at the station" is perfect! The bus may have "pulled over" at the station but did it stop? Who knows?

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "pull over" for the bus?

    Quote Originally Posted by amigos4 View Post
    "The bus stopped at the station" is perfect! The bus may have "pulled over" at the station but did it stop? Who knows?
    Interesting. In BrE, if you say that a vehicle "pulled over", it is generally taken to mean that it went from one part of the road to another (probably the hard shoulder or the area outside a garage, for example), and stopped. To be "pulled over by the police" means that the police drove behind/in front of you with a blue light flashing and indicated that you should pull over to the side of the road - meaning "pull over and stop" of course!

    As far as my response to the original question goes, I would say that a bus either stops or pulls in to a bus stop, and that it pulls into the bus depot/bus station.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: "pull over" for the bus?

    Buses on city streets do indeed "pull over" when they stop to pick up or drop off passengers. If there is sufficient width on the street or an area makred off in front of the stop where no parking is allowed. This allows traffic behind the bus to continue on.

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