Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • Pakistan
      • Current Location:
      • Pakistan

    • Join Date: Mar 2013
    • Posts: 296
    #1

    You poured/threw cold water on my hopes.

    Hi teachers,

    You poured/threw cold water on my hopes. Correct?

    Many thanks.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,843
    #2

    Re: You poured/threw cold water on my hopes.

    I don't find either of them natural.

    I would use "You dashed my hopes."
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • Pakistan
      • Current Location:
      • Pakistan

    • Join Date: Mar 2013
    • Posts: 296
    #3

    Re: You poured/threw cold water on my hopes.

    Thank you, emsr. But are they correct?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #4

    Re: You poured/threw cold water on my hopes.

    Yes, those are correct idioms, at least in AmE. Here is a citation from The Free Dictionary.

    throw cold water on somethingalso pour cold water on somethingto criticize or stop something that some people are enthusiastic about The proposal seemed reasonable enough, but authorities quickly threw cold water on it.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #5

    Re: You poured/threw cold water on my hopes.

    ems has said they are not natural. Is there any point at all in considering whether they are correct? "My pink horse, who is married to a five-legged spider, rides a bicycle and speaks fluent Arabic" is grammatically correct, but not a sentence that most of us would ever need to use.

    There are no citations for pour/s/ing/ed cold water on hopes in COCA. I suppose there is no reason why one should not pour cold water on hopes. It just happens that most native speakers don't.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #6

    Re: You poured/threw cold water on my hopes.

    But they seem natural to me, and that idiom has a definition.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #7

    Re: You poured/threw cold water on my hopes.

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    But they seem natural to me, and that idiom has a definition.
    What definition is that?

    ps (later): Sorry, I missed it. You did indeed give one.
    Last edited by 5jj; 24-May-2013 at 00:21.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,843
    #8

    Re: You poured/threw cold water on my hopes.

    I haven't found "to pour cold water on [someone's] hope" in any idiom dictionary/reference.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. charliedeut's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 5,560
    #9

    Re: You poured/threw cold water on my hopes.

    I was curious, because in Spanish we do use that idiom with the same structure, and could not find anything connected to it in English. I found things along the lines of "to come as a [complete] shock" or "to be a bolt from the blue".

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  8. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #10

    Re: You poured/threw cold water on my hopes.

    <<<I haven't found "to pour cold water on [someone's] hope" in any idiom dictionary/reference.>>>





    I posted one definition. Do you want more? The word "hopes" is just one possibility.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. having poured the contents..
    By bosun in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 15-Apr-2013, 14:38
  2. [General] poured water on it to rut it out
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-Sep-2010, 11:31
  3. [General] cold chisel, cold metal, cold steel, cold iron
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22-Sep-2008, 11:47
  4. [Tdol's Blog] You may have cold water spray
    By Tdol in forum UsingEnglish.com Content
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-Apr-2006, 11:55

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •