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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
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    #1

    teach for teacher

    The following is part of a CNN report on the Oklahoma tornado.

    "We had to pull a car off a teacher and she had three little kids underneath her," one first responder, in tears, told KFOR. "Good job, teach."
    Is it common to call your teacher "teach" instead of Ms. X?
    The Urban Dictionary says: short for teacher, usually used insultingly
    How do you interprete it?

  1. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: teach for teacher

    It is definitely not insulting in this context. It might be insulting if addressed by a teenager to his or her teacher, or it might be affectionate. The latter is more likely in my opinion.

    I don't know how common it is these days. It used to be heard when I was at school, and that was a very long time ago, so my guess would be that it is uncommon today.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: teach for teacher

    It's not common usage in BrE.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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