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    #1

    All sentence, but "and shallowly or not, I am ... wins, going away" in particular

    Hello all forum members!

    If, for instance, you are looking to control your weight and shallowly or not, I am running wins, going away.

    I find the above sentence rather strange. Its meaning is even stranger.

    I will try to decipher it, however.

    The general idea is that "If, for example, you are intending to control your weight, running wins by a lot of points (easily, no efforts made).

    I think I am beginning to understand the whole of the sentence.

    Let me start again.

    "If, for example, you are intending to control your weight - whether you treat it shallowly (not seriously) or not (I, for one, am serious about it) - walking doesn't compare to running (walking doesn't stand a chance of defeating running).

    Thank you.

    What do you think?

    Is It Better to Walk or Run? - NYTimes.com

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    #2

    Re: All sentence, but "and shallowly or not, I am ... wins, going away" in particul

    hi,
    Please note I'm not a teacher nor a native speaker;

    I think you are right there with your interpretation. If we leave out the - and shallowly or nor, I'm - the meaning is clear up to the "going away" so let's leave it out as well.

    If, for instance, you are looking to control your weight running wins.

    I'm unfamiliar with "going away" in that context but it could be a simple mistake.
    The only expression I think that would have anything to do with "go" and "a/way" and fit in for the intended meaning :
    a way to go; by far; 'go a long way' and 'far and away'


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    #3

    Re: All sentence, but "and shallowly or not, I am ... wins, going away" in particul

    I am familiar with "going away". If you look it up in going away - definition in British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionary Online, you will find out that it makes sense to use the phrase in the sentence under discusssion.
    Let others express their opinion.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: All sentence, but "and shallowly or not, I am ... wins, going away" in particul

    No, I'm pretty sure that "and shallowly or not, I am" means, "Whether shallowly or not, I am looking to control my weight", i.e. I might be doing it shallowly.

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    #5

    Re: All sentence, but "and shallowly or not, I am ... wins, going away" in particul

    hi,
    I'm sorry for hijacking the post :D

    What is "and shallowly or not, I am" ? Is it interjection, digression, interruption ?
    Is the coma after wins required ?

    cheers

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    #6

    Re: All sentence, but "and shallowly or not, I am ... wins, going away" in particul

    It is set off with dashes, indicating that it is an interruption in the main thought of the sentence.

    I like the comma after wins, as it separates the thoughts. But others might do without it.

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    #7

    Re: All sentence, but "and shallowly or not, I am ... wins, going away" in particul

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskin View Post
    hi,
    I'm sorry for hijacking the post :D

    What is "and shallowly or not, I am" ? Is it interjection, digression, interruption ?
    Is the coma after wins required ?

    cheers
    It's a parenthetical clause set off by dashes. I don't know if a comma is needed, since I'm not familiar with the saying "going away" or how it's used.

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