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    #1

    at 0 hours and 24 hours?

    "Rats were administered gavage doses of 250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg/day flurbiprofen at 0 hours and 24 hours." I've been trying to undestand the meaning of the sentence but nothing comes to mind. What's "at 0 hours and 24 hours" mean?

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    #2

    Re: at 0 hours and 24 hours?

    They seem to mean the times of day. Except, of course, that 0 and 24 are the same time of day. So, it doesn't make sense to me.

  1. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: at 0 hours and 24 hours?

    Although I'm not an expert, it suggests me that they were given a first dose (which was considered the beginning of the experiment) and another dose 24 hours (ie a day) later.
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

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    #4

    Re: at 0 hours and 24 hours?

    Quote Originally Posted by charliedeut View Post
    Although I'm not an expert, it suggests me that they were given a first dose (which was considered the beginning of the experiment) and another dose 24 hours (ie a day) later.
    I would think that as well, but it says the doses were mg/kg/day. Which would imply a daily schedule. Something still doesn't make sense. If I give a dose now and one in 24 hours, then I am basically giving one dose/day.

  2. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: at 0 hours and 24 hours?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    I would think that as well, but it says the doses were mg/kg/day. Which would imply a daily schedule. Something still doesn't make sense. If I give a dose now and one in 24 hours, then I am basically giving one dose/day.
    Of course, there's always the possibility of a misprint of the numbers, so the hours would be 10 and 24. Maybe the OP could clarify this.
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: at 0 hours and 24 hours?

    This is common in experimental design. The drugs were given one day and then repeated at the same time on day 2.

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