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    #1

    verbs connected with the idea of working hard

    Since I've been studying a number of verbs, especially phrasal verbs, generally used when we have to talk about work, hard work, slogs at working, or study and I have come across several of them, I have already checked their meanings in my dictionary but, as far as I have caught they all mean the same thing...now my question is this: can you confirm me that they mean the same and that they can be used when for example a person is required to work or to study hard for his/her job or at school?

    The verbs and the expressions I have found are the following: to slog away, to beaver away, to fling oneself into, to knuckle down, to buckle down.

    Are they all commonly used in everyday's life? Do they sound strange or can I use them to mean what I have written above?

    Thank you for you help.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: verbs connected with the idea of working hard

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    Since I've been studying a number of verbs, especially phrasal verbs, generally used when we have to talk about work, hard work, slogs at working, or study and I have come across several of them, I have already checked their meanings in my dictionary but, as far as I have caught they all mean the same thing...now my question is this: can you confirm me that they mean the same and that they can be used when for example a person is required to work or to study hard for his/her job or at school?

    The verbs and the expressions I have found are the following: to slog away, to beaver awayA bit dated - OK for someone who's hard at work already., to fling oneself into More often 'throw...' It means to get started., to knuckle down To do something you don't want to; doesn't have to be work specifically, to buckle down Again rather dated, and applies only to the start of a job. A more modern one is 'get stuck in'.

    Are they all commonly used in everyday's life? Do they sound strange or can I use them to mean what I have written above?

    Thank you for you help.
    There are many many more colloquial ones, often vulgar. 'To work one's <noun> off' is a common one, where the noun can be whatever substantive cuss-word you choose. 'Working your guts out' is less offensive. and 'working your heart out' not offensive at all; nor is 'working your socks off'. There are also many many variants of 'working like a dog', with whatever noun the audience will stand substituted for 'dog'. Literary variants are'working like a Trojan' and 'working like one possessed'.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 04-Jun-2013 at 15:05. Reason: Typo

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: verbs connected with the idea of working hard

    PS Also 'Going at it hammer and tongs' - though this often implies a confrontation of some kind... Going at it hell for leather... loads more I'm sure.

    b

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    #4

    Re: verbs connected with the idea of working hard

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    Since I've been studying a number of verbs, especially phrasal verbs, generally used when we have to talk about work, hard work, slogs at working, or study and I have come across several of them, I have already checked their meanings in my dictionary but, as far as I have caught they all mean the same thing...now my question is this: can you confirm me that they mean the same and that they can be used when for example a person is required to work or to study hard for his/her job or at school?

    The verbs and the expressions I have found are the following: to slog away, to beaver away, to fling oneself into, to knuckle down, to buckle down.

    Are they all commonly used in everyday's life? Do they sound strange or can I use them to mean what I have written above?

    Thank you for you help.
    No, they don't all have the same meaning. Context is the most important issue to consider. "to fling oneself into" a job is to put all of your efforts into that job. If a person flings himself into a job there is the sense that these actions are voluntary. "to knuckle down" is to pay strict attention to the job at hand and to only be concerned with that job. As opposed to, "to fling oneself into", a person is usually told to "knuckle down". I am not familiar with "to beaver away", though I can sense the meaning as beavers tend to work hard on their jobs. It may be an idiom from the UK. Similar ones in the US are: to work like a beaver, to work like a horse, and to work like a slave. Note that "to work like a slave" indicates that the person doing the job is being forced to do that job (compare this with "to fling oneself into"). You can also, "work your fingers to the bone", meaning that you work very hard at a job. This particular idiom carries the sense that the worker receives little pay or recognition. Also, you can "slog away" at a job, meaning that you have worked long hours at a job and are not making much progress. This one seems to be related to slogging through a muddy swamp. It is difficult to walk through a swamp as your feet will stick in the mud making every step an effort.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: verbs connected with the idea of working hard

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    PS Also 'Going at it hammer and tongs' - though this often implies a confrontation of some kind... Going at it hell for leather... loads more I'm sure.

    b
    "Going at it hammer and tongs" also has a sexual connotation.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: verbs connected with the idea of working hard

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    "Going at it hammer and tongs" also has a sexual connotation.
    So does "beaver."

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    #7

    Re: verbs connected with the idea of working hard

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    "Going at it hammer and tongs" also has a sexual connotation.
    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    So does "beaver."
    I have no idea what you two are talking about.

    Perhaps that is because, as a moderator, I have not time for such lewd frivolity. I have to be on the job all the time.

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