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    #1

    Question has gone vs are gone.

    Can we use the present perfect of the verb go to indicate that someone has just left particular place?!? Because i know that he has gone means he is dead now.
    Besides, there is a song called "when you're gone" by Avril lavigne. what is the tense of this sentence? i guess it's neither present perfect nor passive voice. I'm a liitle bit confused, so I need someone who can make it clearer. Thanks in advance.

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    #2

    Re: has gone vs are gone.

    Quote Originally Posted by Adham99ya View Post
    Can we use the present perfect of the verb go to indicate that someone has just left particular place?!? Because i know that he has gone means he is dead now. It can, but it's not the only use e.g. "I drove faster than I should have, but he was gone (from the location)when I arrived."
    Besides, there is a song called "when you're gone" (adjective) by Avril lavigne. what is the tense of this sentence? i guess it's neither present perfect nor passive voice. I'm a liitle bit confused, so I need someone who can make it clearer. Thanks in advance.
    b.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: has gone vs are gone.

    Quote Originally Posted by Adham99ya View Post
    Can we use the present perfect of the verb "go" to indicate that someone has just left a particular place? !? Because I know that "He has gone" means "He is dead now".

    Besides, there is a song called "When You're Gone" by Avril Lavigne. What is the tense of this sentence? I guess it's neither present perfect nor passive voice. I'm a liitle bit confused, so I need someone who can make it clearer. Thanks in advance.
    Please look at the amendments I have made to your post above. Remember the rules of written English:

    - Start every sentence with a capital letter.
    - End every sentence with a single appropriate punctuation mark.
    - Always capitalise the word "I".
    - Always capitalise the first letter of any name.
    - Capitalise each word of a song title.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: has gone vs are gone.

    Quote Originally Posted by Adham99ya View Post
    Can we use the present perfect of the verb go to indicate that someone has just left particular place?!? Because i know that he has gone means he is dead now.
    Besides, there is a song called "when you're gone" by Avril lavigne. what is the tense of this sentence? i guess it's neither present perfect nor passive voice. I'm a liitle bit confused, so I need someone who can make it clearer. Thanks in advance.
    It is actually a very special form of the present perfect.

    In older forms of English, certain verbs, particularly those denoting locomotion, regularly formed their present perfect (as they still do in Modern German) with the verb 'be' rather than 'have'. Now among English verbs only the verb 'go' has retained this facility. It can be considered a kind of linguistic "throwback".

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    #5

    Re: has gone vs are gone.

    How about when you're done?

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    #6

    Re: has gone vs are gone.

    Difficult to account for in the same way, since, unlike 'go' the verb 'do' has never taken 'be' as perfective auxiliary in standard English.

    Most likely, I suspect, it originated - in common with similarly anomalous 'be finished' (vs. 'have finished') - simply as a passive which underwent agent-patient inversion, although other linguists might well have different theories.

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