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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    have her back on the bench and cheer for them

    Does this "have someone back" structure denote a causative verb like "I let her go" or just a state of having or getting something?

    8)Cylie’s teammates were happy to have her back on the bench and cheer for them. But what they really wanted was to find a way for her to be on the court playing basketball with them. That’s when someone came up with the idea of having her shoot free throws.

  2. keannu's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: have her back on the bench and cheer for them

    No one has answered this, so I sometimes wonder why a member gave me "like" like "wotcha".

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    #3

    Re: have her back on the bench and cheer for them

    It's just a state of 'having'.

    I guess wotcha gave it a Like because he/she thought it was a good question and would also be interested in finding out the answer.

    Rover

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: have her back on the bench and cheer for them

    Thanks a lot! Incidentally, do you pronounce "Cylie" as "kailie" or "saili"? Is it K or S sound?

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: have her back on the bench and cheer for them

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Thanks a lot! Incidentally, do you pronounce "Cylie" as "kailie" or "saili"? Is it K or S sound?
    I have never come across the name "Cylie". I have no idea how she would pronounce it.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: have her back on the bench and cheer for them

    I would pronounce it "sigh-lee" but these days, people are constantly giving their children perfectly normal names but using alternative (and sometimes ridiculous) spellings. It wouldn't surprise me in the slightest if "Cylie" is meant to be pronounced the same as "Kylie" but the parents thought they were being clever and original by changing the first letter. If that were the case, I would probably pronounce it "sigh-lee" just to annoy them!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: have her back on the bench and cheer for them

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I would pronounce it "sigh-lee" but these days, people are constantly giving their children perfectly normal names but using alternative (and sometimes ridiculous) spellings. It wouldn't surprise me in the slightest if "Cylie" is meant to be pronounced the same as "Kylie" but the parents thought they were being clever and original by changing the first letter. If that were the case, I would probably pronounce it "sigh-lee" just to annoy them!
    This is probably irrelevant but "Ceallaigh" is the Irish Gaelic spelling of the name "Kelly". The "c" is almost always pronounced "k" in the Irish language. Perhaps the parents have some Irish connection. Although, the "y" would be unusual in that case, since it doesn't exist in the Irish alphabet.

  7. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: have her back on the bench and cheer for them

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Does this "have someone back" structure denote a causative verb like "I let her go" or just a state of having or getting something?

    8)Cylie’s teammates were happy to have her back on the bench and cheer for them. But what they really wanted was to find a way for her to be on the court playing basketball with them. That’s when someone came up with the idea of having her shoot free throws.
    If someone is missing for a while (possibly an injury in sports) and then returns, teammates might say "It's good to have her back". In this case, they wanted her to be able to do more than just sit on the bench and cheer for the others.

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